Dec 10 2016

CDC Reports Improvement in Childhood Obesity among Young Children

A new study shows that 34 of 56 WIC State Agencies are seeing modest decreases in obesity among young children from 2010-2014. The percentage of low-income children (ages 2-4) with obesity enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) decreased from 15.9% in 2010 to 14.5% in 2014. These findings come from a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Researchers analyzed obesity trends from 2000 to 2014 among young children aged 2-4 years from low-income families enrolled in (WIC). The study was recently published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ReportTrends in Obesity among Participants Aged 2-4 Years in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children—United States, 2000-2014 Summary What is already known about this topic? Previous analyses using Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) data found that during 2008–2011, obesity prevalence among children aged 2–4 years who participated in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and other nutrition and health programs declined slightly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and in 19 of 43 states and U.S. territories. What is added by this report? The WIC Participants and Program Characteristics (WIC PC) census data replace the PedNSS system to report obesity prevalence among low-income young children from more jurisdictions consistently. This is the first study to use WIC ...

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Mar 07 2014

World Health Organization To Focus On Global Sugar Intake

From a World Health Organization (WHO) Report: Free sugars contribute to the overall energy density of diets. Ensuring energy balance is critical to maintaining healthy body weight and ensuring optimal nutrient intake. There is increasing concern that consumption of free sugars, particularly in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages, may result in both reduced intake of foods containing more nutritionally adequate calories and an increase in total caloric intake, leading to an unhealthy diet, weight gain and increased risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Also of great concern is the role free sugars play in the development of dental diseases, particularly dental caries. Dental diseases are the most prevalent NCDs globally and though great improvements in prevention and treatment have occurred in the last decades, dental diseases continue to cause pain, anxiety, functional limitation and social handicap through tooth loss, for large numbers of people worldwide. The treatment of dental diseases is expensive—costing between 5 and 10% of health budgets in industrialised countries—and would exceed the financial resources available for the whole of health care for children in the majority of lower-income countries. The objective of this guideline is to provide recommendations on the consumption of free sugars to reduce the risk of NCDs in adults and children, with a particular focus on the prevention and control of weight gain and dental caries. When finalized, the recommendations in this guideline can be used by program managers and policy planners to assess current intake of free sugars relative to a benchmark and develop measures to decrease intake of ...

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Dec 18 2013

Are You Getting Enough Physical Activity?

Some Americans are getting enough, but too many are not • Less than half (48%) of all adults meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines. • Less than 3 in 10 high school students get at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day. • Physical activity can improve health. People who are physically active tend to live longer and have lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Physical activity can also help with weight control, and may improve academic achievement in students. There's more. • Inactive adults have a higher risk for early death, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Rates of activity and inactivity vary across states and regions • Americans living in the South are more likely to be less physically active than Americans living in the West, Northeast and Midwest regions of the country. • To see the 2010 state rates for physical activity and inactivity, please visit the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Prevalence and Trends Data for Exercise, 2010. Some groups are more physically active than others • More non-Hispanic white adults (22.8%) meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity than non-Hispanic black adults (17.3%) and Hispanic adults (14.4%). • Men (52.1%) are more likely than women (42.6%) to meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for aerobic activity. • Younger adults are more likely to meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults. Physical activity and socioeconomic status • Adults ...

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Nov 13 2011

Teenagers Need To Eat More Fiber to Avoid Heart Disease and Diabetes

As we already know, our kids are getting many of their calories each day from sugary foods like soda, energy drinks and sugar loaded snacks. Now, new research by Joseph Carlson of Michigan State University’s Division of Sports and Cardiovascular Nutrition and published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association,  indicates that teens need to increase the fiber in their diets by eating more plant based foods and not focus on restricting the fats. According to the USDA (choosemyplate.gov), here are the health benefits from eating more plant based foods (fruits and vegetables): Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke. Eating a diet rich in some vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may protect against certain types of cancers. Diets rich in foods containing fiber, such as some vegetables and fruits, may reduce the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Eating vegetables and fruits rich in potassium as part of an overall healthy diet may lower blood pressure, and may also reduce the risk of developing kidney stones and help to decrease bone loss. Eating foods such as fruits that are lower in calories per cup instead of some other higher-calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake Dietary fiber from fruits, as part of an overall ...

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Apr 06 2011

Best Diet in the Universe – Metabolism – Are You A Fast Burner Or Slow Burner? : Graehm Gray

Hello my fans. Welcome to the Best Diet in the Universe Series- the Fast Burner versus the Slow Burner. Why is my friend losing weight faster than I am- and we are eating the same foods and exercising the same? Yes, I get asked this question a lot. In fact I am sure that each and every one of you out there, has at one time or another, encountered a person that no matter what they ate, were always thin. You know who I am talking about. That one girl or boy that could eat virtually anything-candy, ice cream, potatoes or pasta. That’s right anything- and they would always remain thin. How could they do that? How are they able to eat lots of carbohydrates and still remain thin? Well my friends, that is all a result of metabolism. Of course there are some medical conditions that could cause a person to be able to eat lots of calories and not gain weight, but for this column, we will focus on generally healthy people with different types of metabolism. Metabolism-what’s that? From the Greek meaning "to change", the metabolism is the sum total of all chemical reactions in the body that are responsible for producing energy, growth and eliminating waste. Metabolism represents the processes in the body responsible for maintaining life-some substance (food) are broken down to deliver needed ...

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