Oct 18 2016

Let’s All Celebrate World Osteoporosis Day!

Nerdel wants all parents and grandparents to be aware of how important your bones are!   What is World Osteoporosis Day? World Osteoporosis Day takes place every year on October 20, launching a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Organized by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) every year, World Osteoporosis Day involves campaigns by national osteoporosis patient societies from around the world with activities in over 90 countries.   History of World Osteoporosis Day The concept for World Osteoporosis Day started with a campaign launched by the United Kingdom's National Osteoporosis Society and supported by European Commission on October 20, 1996. Since 1997, the day has been organized by IOF. In 1998 and 1999, the World Health Organization acted as co-sponsor of World Osteoporosis Day. Since 1999, World Osteoporosis Day campaigns have featured a specific theme.  

Osteoporosis
What is osteoporosis? Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men aged 50 years and over will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and fragile, so that they break easily – even as a result of a minor fall, a bump, a sneeze, or a sudden movement. Fractures caused by osteoporosis can be life-threatening and a major cause of pain and long-term disability.  Prevention Can osteoporosis and fractures be prevented? Yes, if action is
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May 23 2016

FDA Changes Nutrition Facts Food Label!

  May 20, 2016 FDA News Release The FDA today finalized the new Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods to reflect new scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. The new label will make it easier for consumers to make better informed food choices. Highlights of the Final Nutrition Facts Label Features a Refreshed Design The “iconic” look of the label remains, but we are making important updates to ensure consumers have access to the information they need to make informed decisions about the foods they eat. These changes include increasing the type size for “Calories,” “servings per container,” and the “Serving size” declaration, and bolding the number of calories and the “Serving size” declaration to highlight this information. Manufacturers must declare the actual amount, in addition to percent Daily Value of vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium. They can voluntarily declare the gram amount for other vitamins and minerals. The footnote is changing to better explain what percent Daily Value means. It will read: “*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.” Reflects Updated Information about Nutrition Science “Added sugars,” in grams and as percent Daily Value, will be included on the label. Scientific data shows that it is ...

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Mar 04 2014

FDA Proposes New Food Label Changes

The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. - Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science - Updated Serving Size Requirements and New Labeling Requirements for Certain Package Sizes - Refreshed Design Here is a glimpse of the proposed changes: The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. 1. Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science Require information about “added sugars.” Many experts recommend consuming fewer calories from added sugar because they can decrease the intake of nutrient-rich foods while increasing calorie intake. Update daily values for nutrients like sodium, dietary fiber and Vitamin D. Daily values are used to calculate the Percent Daily Value listed on the label, which help consumers understand the nutrition information in the context of a total daily diet. Require manufacturers to declare the amount of potassium and Vitamin D on the label, because they are new “nutrients of public health significance.” Calcium and iron would continue to be required, and Vitamins A and C could be included on ...

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Sep 08 2009

Meryl Brandwein RD/LDN: Nutrients in Our Food-Do You Know What You’re Eating, and Why?

Walk into any bookstore and you will find hundreds of diet books lining the shelves. Surf the web and your likely to find thousands of diet tips, various questionable nutritional recommendations, as well as a myriad of individuals, some professionals some not so professional, all of whom profess that their plan offers the solution to your nutritional prayers. It is no wonder that we are confused. It seems as though we have nothing left to eat anymore. Our goal at The Nerdel Company is to set the record straight and declare that all of the macronutrients: Proteins, Carbohydrates and Fats play a vital role in our diets. The focus here is to learn how to strike that balance between all three. Let's start with the basics. Proteins are known as the building blocks of life. A protein is formed from many smaller amino acids. These amino acids are what make up our muscle tissue, organs, immune system and hormones to name a few. There are a total of 20 amino acids. Eight of them are essential. This means that we must obtain them from our diets. The rest of the amino acids can be made from, or synthesized by the body from those eight essential amino acids. All animal proteins contain the necessary amino acids our bodies need to produce all of the other amino acids. These are known as complete proteins. ...

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