Oct 01 2016

Who Needs The Flu Shot? You Do!!!!!

An important message from the NIH and CDC: Influenza, or flu, can knock you off your feet and leave you miserable for nearly a week. It can cause fever, aches and pains, coughing, and exhaustion. The best way to avoid this fate is to get a flu vaccine each year as early as possible, before or even during flu season, which usually lasts from October to as late as May. The vaccine is available as either a shot or a nasal spray. Flu is highly contagious. When infected people cough or sneeze, the flu virus can spread to others up to 6 feet away. As many as 1 in 5 Americans come down with the flu each year, and kids are 2 to 3 times more likely than adults to get sick with the flu. Most cases are mild, but flu can also be serious, leading to hospitalization and even death. Flu vaccines can reduce illness, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school. Vaccines can also prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths. When more people get vaccinated, it’s harder for the flu virus to spread. Experts recommend that everyone 6 months and older get the annual flu vaccine, with rare exceptions. Talk to your doctor if you have questions about which vaccine options are best for you and your family. Learn more at www.flu.gov What is Influenza (also called Flu)? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness ...

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Jul 04 2016

Where Do You Stand On Immunization?

A Press release from the World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization coverage: Where do we stand?   Key facts Immunization prevents illness, disability and death from vaccine-preventable diseases including cervical cancer, diphtheria, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, pertussis (whooping cough), pneumonia, polio, rotavirus diarrhoea, rubella and tetanus. Global vaccination coverage is generally holding steady. Uptake of new and underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. But an estimated 18.7 million infants worldwide are still missing out on basic vaccines. Overview Immunization averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles. Global vaccination coverage—the proportion of the world’s children who receive recommended vaccines—has remained steady for the past few years. During 2014, about 86% (115 million) of infants worldwide received 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine, protecting them against infectious diseases that can cause serious illness and disability or be fatal. By 2014, 129 countries had reached at least 90% coverage of DTP3 vaccine.   Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes meningitis and pneumonia. Hib vaccine had been introduced in 192 countries by the end of 2014. Global coverage with 3 doses of Hib vaccine is estimated at 56%. There is great variation between regions. In the Americas, coverage is estimated at 90%, while it is only 21% and 30% in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia Regions respectively. Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ...

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Nov 15 2013

Did You Get Your Flu Shot? It’s Not Too Late!

Did you get your flu shot yet? It's not too late! As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, many people think that the flu season ends in November and its already too late to get vaccinated. Well my friends, the answer is that it's not too late. According to Dr. Anne Schuchat, Assistant Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service and Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, "Flu season typically peaks in late February and can last as late as May." Dr. Schuchat also emphasized, " We are encouraging people who have not yet been vaccinated this season to get vaccinated now." Some of the typical flu symptoms for millions of people every season, include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle aches and pains, fatigue and very miserable days spent in bed, usually home from work or school. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized in the United States every year from flu complications including 20,000 children! Over a period of 30 years, between 1976 and 2006, estimates of the yearly flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3000 to a high of about 50,000 people. The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine to everyone 6 months and older. Flu shots are generally safe (most common side effects of the shot are ...

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Sep 03 2009

Graehm Gray-Should You Get the Novel Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine?

The vaccine against the infection with novel influenza A H1N1 will be available in October 2009. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the current seasonal influenza vaccines are not likely to provide protection against novel influenza H1N1. Here are the five main targeted groups that the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization (ACIP) recommends get the vaccine: Pregnant Women-they are at higher risk of complications and can potentially provide protection to infants who cannot be vaccinated Persons who live with or provide care for infants aged <6 months (e.g. parents, siblings, and daycare providers)- younger infants are at higher risk of influenza-related complications and cannot be vaccinated. Vaccination of those in close contact with infants less than 6 months old might help protect infants by “cocooning” them from the virus; Health-care and emergency medical services personnel-infections among healthcare workers have been reported and this can be a potential source of infection for vulnerable patients. Also, increased absenteeism in this population could reduce healthcare system capacity; Persons aged 6 months-24 years- Children from 6 months through 18 years of age because there have been many cases of novel H1N1 influenza in children and they are in close contact with each other in school and day care settings, which increases the likelihood of disease spread, and Young adults 19 through 24 years of age because there have been many cases of novel H1N1 influenza in ...

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