Aug 18 2017

Asthma In Children Is Under-diagnosed and Under-treated!!

A report from the WHO and CDC: Key facts Asthma is one of the major noncommunicable diseases. It is a chronic disease of the the air passages of the lungs which inflames and narrows them. Some 235 million people currently suffer from asthma. It is a common disease among children. Most asthma-related deaths occur in low- and lower-middle income countries. According to the latest WHO estimates, released in December 2016, there were 383 000 deaths due to asthma in 2015. The strongest risk factors for developing asthma are inhaled substances and particles that may provoke allergic reactions or irritate the airways. Medication can control asthma. Avoiding asthma triggers can also reduce the severity of asthma. Appropriate management of asthma can enable people to enjoy a good quality of life. Asthma is a major noncommunicable disease characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, which vary in severity and frequency from person to person. Symptoms may occur several times in a day or week in affected individuals, and for some people become worse during physical activity or at night. During an asthma attack, the lining of the bronchial tubes swell, causing the airways to narrow and reducing the flow of air into and out of the lungs. Recurrent asthma symptoms frequently cause sleeplessness, daytime fatigue, reduced activity levels and school and work absenteeism. Asthma has a relatively low fatality rate compared to other ...

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Jul 23 2017

What Do You Know About Juvenile Arthritis (JRA)?

A report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS): Who Gets Juvenile Arthritis? Juvenile arthritis affects children of all ages and ethnic backgrounds. About 294,000 American children under age 18 have arthritis or other rheumatic conditions. What Causes Juvenile Arthritis? Juvenile arthritis is usually an autoimmune disorder. As a rule, the immune system helps fight off harmful bacteria and viruses. But in an autoimmune disorder, the immune system attacks some of the body’s healthy cells and tissues. Scientists don’t know why this happens or what causes the disorder. Some think it’s a two-step process in children: something in a child’s genes (passed from parents to children) makes the child more likely to get arthritis, and something like a virus then sets off the arthritis. What Are the Symptoms and Signs of Juvenile Arthritis? The most common symptoms of juvenile arthritis are joint swelling, pain, and stiffness that doesn’t go away. Usually it affects the knees, hands, and feet, and it’s worse in the morning or after a nap. Other signs include: Limping in the morning because of a stiff knee Excessive clumsiness High fever and skin rash Swelling in lymph nodes in the neck and other parts of the body. Most children with arthritis have times when the symptoms get better or go away (remission) and other times when they get worse (flare). Arthritis in children can cause ...

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Jul 02 2017

Why Are You Waiting To Vaccinate Your Children?

We share more than food and culture within our homes and communities. We can also spread disease. Luckily, we live in a time when vaccines can protect us from many of the most serious illnesses. Staying current on your shots helps you—and your neighbors—avoid getting and spreading disease. Vaccines have led to large reductions in illness and death—for both kids and adults—compared with the “pre-vaccine era,” says Dr. David M. Koelle, a vaccine expert at the University of Washington in Seattle. Vaccines will prevent about 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths among U.S. children born over the last 20 years, according to a recent report. Vaccines harness your immune system’s natural ability to detect and destroy disease-causing germs and then “remember” the best way to fight these germs in the future. Vaccination, or immunization, has completely eliminated naturally occurring smallpox worldwide—to the point that we no longer need to get shots against this fast-spreading, once-deadly disease. Polio too has been eliminated in the U.S. and most other nations as well, thanks to immunizations. Poliovirus can affect the brain and spinal cord, leaving people unable to move their arms or legs, or sometimes unable to breathe. “These childhood diseases used to be dreaded problems that would kill or paralyze children,” says Koelle. “In the 1950s, it was a common occurrence for kids to be fine in the spring, get ...

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Jun 10 2017

Pregnancy Diet Consisting of Refined Grains Raises Child Obesity Risk

Pregnancy diet high in refined grains could increase child obesity risk by age 7, NIH study suggests Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study. These findings, which appear online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, were part of the Diabetes & Women’s Health Study, a research project led by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar during pregnancy, affects about 5 percent of all pregnancies in the United States and may lead to health problems for mothers and newborns. The authors noted that previous studies have linked diets high in refined grains — such as white rice — to obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The researchers compared records from 918 mother-child pairs who took part in the Danish National Birth Cohort, a study that followed the pregnancies of more than 91,000 women in Denmark. They found that children born to women with gestational diabetes who consumed the most refined grain (more than 156 grams per day) were twice as likely to be obese at age 7, compared to children born to women with ...

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May 30 2017

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World!

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World! 422 million adults live with diabetes, mainly in developing countries.   WHO calls for global action to halt rise in and improve care for people with diabetes.   Geneva: The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced. The WHO is issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first Global report on diabetes, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions. “If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.” Diabetes is a chronic, progressive NCD characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough of ...

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May 28 2017

World NoTobacco Day May 31st,2017: #NoTobacco

Current Cigarette Smoking Among U.S. Adults Aged 18 Years and Older (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year, with more than 41,000 of these deaths from exposure to secondhand smoke. In addition, smoking-related illness in the United States costs more than $300 billion a year, including nearly $170 billion in direct medical care for adults and $156 billion in lost productivity. In 2015, an estimated 15.1% (36.5 million) U.S. adults were current* cigarette smokers. Of these, 75.7% (27.6 million) smoked every day, and 24.3% (8.9 million) smoked some days. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is continuing its national tobacco education campaign—Tips From Former Smokers (Tips)—with hard-hitting TV commercials that feature real people who have experienced the harms caused by smoking. The campaign ads, which will air beginning January 2017, will again highlight the immediate and long-term damage caused by smoking, and encourage smokers to quit. CDC launched the first Tips™ campaign in 2012 to lower smoking rates and save lives, and the campaign has been very successful since then. Results of a CDC study published in the medical journal, The Lancet, show that in 2012 an estimated 1.64 million smokers tried to quit during the 2012 campaign period, and about 100,000 of them quit for good. After the launch of the nine-week long ...

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May 01 2017

National Physical Fitness & Sports Month, May 2017

A report from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay. This May, stay motivated with the President's Council's Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards. There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans to be active. We’ve created this #MoveInMay Playbook where you can find themes, tips and motivational messages that you can promote throughout the month. You can also get ideas to #MoveInMay and every day at 0to60fitness.org ! Importance of Physical Activity Physical activity provides long-term health benefits for everyone! By being active, you will burn calories that you store from eating throughout the day and—it can be as easy as walking the dog or as rigorous as running a marathon. Providing opportunities for children to be active early on puts them on a path to better physical and mental health. It's never too late to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. Physical Activity & Obesity Physical activity, along with proper nutrition, is beneficial to people of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. And it is important that everyone gets active: over the last 20 years, there's been a significant increase in obesity in ...

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Apr 30 2017

Nerdel Celebrates World No Tobacco Day 2017

A World Health Organization (WHO) news report: Tobacco – a threat to development Every year, on 31 May, WHO and partners mark World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), highlighting the health and additional risks associated with tobacco use, and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. The theme for World No Tobacco Day 2017 is "Tobacco – a threat to development."   Smoking facts from the CDC: Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.1 Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death. The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year on cigarette advertising and promotions.4 Smoking costs the United States billions of dollars each year.1,5 State spending on tobacco prevention and control does not meet CDC-recommended levels.1,6,7 1% of all adults (36.5 million people): 16.7% of males, 13.6% of females were current cigarette smokers in 2015.8 Thousands of young people start smoking cigarettes every day.1 Many adult cigarette smokers want to quit smoking.   About the campaign It will demonstrate the threats that the tobacco industry poses to the sustainable development of all countries, including the health and economic well-being of their citizens. It will propose measures that governments and the public should take to promote health and development by confronting the global tobacco crisis. Goals of the World No Tobacco Day 2017 campaign Highlight the links between the use of tobacco products, tobacco control and sustainable development. ...

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Apr 22 2017

Nerdel Celebrates EARTH DAY 2017 by remembering the EPA’s 1996 FOOD Quality PROTECTION ACT

Press release from March 1997:   FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 EPA ANNOUNCES COMPREHENSIVE PLANS FOR PROTECTING FOOD SAFETY, REGULATING PESTICIDES UNDER THE 1996 FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a comprehensive, detailed plan for implementing the l996 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). The new law includes sweeping new food safety protections and requires major changes in how pesticides are regulated, with the goal of improving environmental and public health protection, especially for children. “The Food Quality Protection Act is one of the most significant pieces of legislation enacted in the past two decades,” said EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner. “We are committed to providing greater assurance that infants and children are protected from pesticide risks, expanding the public right-to-know about pesticides, and using the best available science in reaching our regulatory decisions as we carry out this important new law.” The FQPA Implementation Plan is based on five guiding principles that will govern the Agency’s actions: sound science; a protective, health-based approach to food safety; promotion of safer, effective pest control methods; an open, fair and consistent process that involves consultation with stakeholders and an informed public; and public accountability of EPA’s actions and resources to achieve the goals of the law. The major provisions of the new law include: o Establishing a single, health-based standard for all pesticide residues in food, whether raw or processed; o Providing for a more ...

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Apr 21 2017

World Immunization Week 2017

Vaccines Work A report by the World Health Organization (WHO): World Immunization Week – celebrated in the last week of April – aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives and is widely recognized as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Today, there are still 19.4 million unvaccinated and under-vaccinated children in the world. Five years into the Decade of Vaccines 2017 marks the halfway point in the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) – endorsed by 194 Member States of the World Health Assembly in May 2012 – which aims to prevent millions of deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases by 2020 through universal access to immunization. Despite improvements in individual countries and a strong global rate of new vaccine introduction, all of the targets for disease elimination—including measles, rubella, and maternal and neonatal tetanus—are behind schedule. In order for everyone, everywhere to survive and thrive, countries must make more concerted efforts to reach GVAP goals by 2020. Additionally, those countries that have achieved or made forward progress towards achieving the goals must work to sustain those efforts over time.   Why immunization matters now more than ever Expanding access to immunization is crucial to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Routine immunization is a building block of strong primary health care and universal health coverage—it provides a point of contact for health ...

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