Mar 12 2017

Nerdel Celebrates National Nutrition Month 2017

ChooseMyPlate.gov helps to educate about a healthier lifestyle!!! MyPlate is a reminder to find your healthy eating style and build it throughout your lifetime. Everything you eat and drink matters. The right mix can help you be healthier now and in the future. This means: Focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Choose foods and beverages with less saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars. Start with small changes to build healthier eating styles. Support healthy eating for everyone. Eating healthy is a journey shaped by many factors, including our stage of life, situations, preferences, access to food, culture, traditions, and the personal decisions we make over time. All your food and beverage choices count. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you create a healthier eating style that meets your individual needs and improves your health. Take a look at A Brief History of USDA Food Guides to learn more about previous food guidance symbols. All food and beverage choices matter – focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Focus on making healthy food and beverage choices from all five food groups including fruitsvegetablesgrainsprotein foods, and dairy to get the nutrients you need. Eat the right amount of calories for you based on your age, sex, height, weight, and physical activity level. Building a healthier eating style can help you avoid overweight and obesity and reduce your risk of diseases such as heart disease, ...

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Jan 02 2016

You Need More Brown Fat!

A report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Scientists have uncovered a pathway in mice that allows white fat — a contributor to obesity and type 2 diabetes — to burn calories as if it were brown fat or muscle. The body uses white fat to store extra energy. Too much white fat (obesity) increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and other diseases. Brown fat, in contrast, generates heat to maintain body temperature and, like muscle, has lots of calorie-burning mitochondria. Brown fat is found in small mammals like rodents throughout their lives. Humans have it at birth, but we lose it as we age. Researchers once thought that our brown fat was essentially nonexistent by adulthood. Recent studies found that not only do adults have brown fat but it also may play an important role in weight control. Boosting the activity of brown fat, or converting white fat to brown fat, could be potential strategies for fighting obesity. A team of NIH researchers led by Dr. Sushil G. Rane of NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) were studying a protein called TGF-beta. TGF-beta and its related factors are known to control the development, growth and function of many different cell types. Blood levels of TGF-beta have been linked to obesity in both mice and humans. In previous work, the team found that the TGF-beta pathway plays ...

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Dec 19 2015

What’s Your Micronutrient IQ?

An important report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) Micronutrients are dietary components, often referred to as vitamins and minerals, which although only required by the body in small amounts, are vital to development, disease prevention, and well being. Micronutrients are not produced in the body and must be derived from the diet. Deficiencies in micronutrients such as iron, iodine, vitamin A, folate and zinc can have devastating consequences. At least half of children worldwide ages 6 months to 5 years suffer from one or more micronutrient deficiency, and globally more than 2 billion people are affected. The International Micronutrient Malnutrition Prevention and Control (IMMPaCt)* project, part of the CDC,  focuses primarily on helping to eliminate deficiencies in iron, vitamin A, iodine, folate and zinc. Iron Iron is an essential mineral critical for motor and cognitive development. Children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to the consequences of iron deficiency. Low hemoglobin concentration (anemia) affects 43% of children 5 years of age and 38% of pregnant women globally Anemia during pregnancy increases the risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and low birth weight. Maternal and neonatal deaths are a major cause of mortality, together causing between 2.5 million and 3.4 million deaths worldwide WHO recommends iron and folic acid supplements for reducing anemia and improving iron status among women of reproductive age. Flour fortification with iron and folic acid is globally recognized as one of the most ...

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May 04 2015

NATIONAL PHYSICAL FITNESS AND SPORTS MONTH, 2015: A Presidential Proclamation!

A PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA     Sports are a fundamental part of American culture.  They foster our country's competitive drive, help us stay healthy, and teach us what it takes to succeed -- not only on the softball diamond or the basketball court, but also in life. Sports and fitness reflect our national character, and they help us unlock our full potential.  During National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, we recognize parents, coaches, educators, and all those who instill in our children the importance of regular exercise, and we invite all people to invest in their own wellbeing by finding a way to be active each day. Physical fitness is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle.  Regular exercise can produce long-term health benefits; it can help prevent chronic diseases, combat obesity, relieve stress, and increase the chances of living longer.  By making physical activity part of your daily routine -- at least 30 minutes for adults and 60 minutes for children -- you can put yourself on the path to better physical and mental health. This year marks the fifth anniversary of First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative, which has helped increase opportunities for physical activity and inspire Americans of all ages to lead healthy, active lives.  To celebrate, the First Lady is challenging everyone to #GimmeFive things they are doing to eat better, be more active, and ...

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Jul 16 2012

Watch Out For Lightning!

Hello my friends, and welcome to the Summer of 2012. I usually write about nutrition and fitness, but this year I am going to stray a bit and write about a serious killer: lightning. According to the National Weather Service (noaa.gov), summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena— lightning. Each year in the U.S., there are about 25 million cloud-to-ground lightning strikes- each one of these a potential killer. During the last 30 years, lightning has killed an average of 73 people per year in the U.S. This is more than the 68 that are killed by tornadoes or the average of 16 killed by hurricanes. Because lightning only claims one or two victims at a time, and because it does not cause the mass destruction left in the wake of hurricanes or tornadoes, lightning generally receives much less attention than the more destructive storm-related killers. Lightning also injures 300 people a year; however, undocumented injuries caused by lightning are likely much higher. While many people think they are aware of the dangers of lightning, the vast majority are not. Lack of understanding with regard to the dangers of lightning continues to be a significant problem in the U.S. Many people do not act to protect their lives, their property and the lives of others in a timely ...

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Mar 18 2012

How Do I To Lose Weight? Please Help Me!!!

Here we go again, the age old question that continues to make headlines: to lose weight, should we limit the total amount of calories, carbohydrates or the fat grams that we eat? Or should we eat endless amounts of fat and protein and just limit the starchy foods? Or should we eat whole grains, proteins and low fat? Or maybe just liquid protein, or rice or cabbage or grapefruit? What is the answer? Well, it seems that we are slowly getting directed to the answer my friends. A research projected headed by Andrew D. Calvin, M.D., MPH from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, and presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism (EPI/NPAM) meeting in San Diego, suggests that not getting enough sleep will increase the amount of calories that are consumed. In fact, as sleep time decreases, calories intake rises. So it seems that the longer we remain awake, the more we tend to eat. I think this makes a lot of sense. I know from a personal stand point, if I am up late, reading or reviewing the literature, I tend to visit the kitchen quite often. And I can tell by the scale in the morning (besides my pants getting tighter), that I have gained weight because of my nocturnal eating patterns. I bet each and every one of you reading ...

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Jan 13 2012

The “You’re Fat” Tax Is Coming!

Okay my friends, I don’t want to be the “I told you” type but I did! The “you’re fat” tax is coming soon. So you ask, what in the world is a “fat tax”? I am glad you asked. As we all are aware, obesity is growing at an alarming rate. Most of us are already overweight and some of us are way overweight-yes face it we are obese. Come on, take a look at your waist line. Look down there now. You can see it as plain as day. Yes, say it with me, I am overweight. Good-that’s a start. You have tried dieting, exercising and nothing seems to work.  Well, our government seems to think that it is now up to our elected public officials to help correct an epidemic. How, you may ask? How does the government respond to issues that threaten public safety-by making new laws and regulations and yes, you know it, it’s on the tip of your tongue-yes, taxes! Of course, taxes-a penalty for this indiscretion. Only this time, the indiscretion is being overweight. As many friends of mine point out, when injuries and fatal accidents as a result of car crashes became major issues, wearing seatbelts was advised. However this advisory didn’t help. So the next step was a law and regulation that made it mandatory for everyone to buckle-up. And it’s working. ...

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Dec 18 2011

Boston Celtics Forward Jeff Green To Have Unexpected Heart Surgery

Professional basketball player Jeff Green of the Boston Celtics went in to have his annual physical and came out with unexpected news: he has an aortic aneurysm and will need to have surgery. Green, 25, will undergo surgery at the Cleveland Clinic and will miss the entire 2011-2012 abbreviated NBA basket ball season. What is an aortic aneurysm anyway? The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body and sometimes due to various medical  conditions and risk factors (e.g. high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol, male gender, emphysema, genetic factors and obesity), it becomes very large and dilated and can balloon outward which is called an aneurysm. This ballooning has a high risk of bursting or rupturing, which is usually catastrophic and most of the time lethal. The key is to catch it early!! What are the symptoms of an aortic aneurysm? In most cases, the aneurysms develop slowly over a long time and can be painless while growing to a large size.  As the blood vessel grows and expands, sometimes it can grow rapidly and start to tear. When it tears, the symptoms may be the following: pain in the abdomen or back, pain that radiates into the groin, buttocks and legs, nausea, vomiting, rapid heart rate, clammy skin and finally shock. What are the physical signs of an aortic aneurysm?  A lump in the abdominal area or feeling a pulsation in ...

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Dec 05 2011

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH NEWS: WOMEN WHO EAT LOTS OF VEGETABLES HAVE A LOWER RISK OF STROKE, VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AND EFFECT ON BRAIN FUNCTIONING, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE GOES UNTREATED IN MANY TEENS, WHY YOU NEED TO TAKE THE FLU VACCINE?

WOMEN WHO EAT LOTS OF VEGETABLES HAVE A LOWER RISK OF STROKE Dr. Susanne Rautiainen and her research group from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, reported in the journal: Stroke, that after collecting data on the dietary habits of women, they found that those women who consumed the highest amount of antioxidant containing foods (foods that have elevated levels of vitamins C, E, carotenoids, flavonoids and phytochemicals-fruits and veggies and grains) had a lower risk of stroke.  Lesson-Make half your plate fruits and veggies-especially if you are a woman!!! VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AND EFFECT ON BRAIN FUNCTIONING Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine presented data recently showing that in a test group of young men, ages 18 to 29, that were told to play a violent video game for ten hours, MRI studies and cognitive testing performed afterwards revealed changes in brain function, and cognitive behavior. These changes did revert back almost to baseline, after a week of not playing the games. Lesson: parents, be careful with what video games your children are playing in your home and at the homes of friends. There is an abundance of violent and incredibly popular video games coming out daily, for all of the techno-game boxes and these games seem to obtain viewing access in many homes with young children. Be aware,  stay informed and stay connected ! HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE GOES UNTREATED IN MANY ...

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Nov 29 2011

The Mediterranean Diet: Why It’s the Best Diet For You! Part One

As I was scanning the morning health news, like I always do every morning, I came across another positive article supporting the Mediterranean Diet. This new research, coming to us from the online European Respiratory Journal , by researchers from the University of Crete in Greece, focused on a sleep condition commonly found in obese individuals called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Sleep apnea is a disorder of the normal sleep pattern associated with pauses in breathing. The study found that obese subjects that followed a Mediterranean diet, had more motivation to stay on the diet, more enthusiasm to follow an exercise plan and a decrease in the episodes of the OSAS. So why is this diet so good for us? Let’s examine it a bit more closely. The Mediterranean diet, took its name from the foods and diet that was being followed by the residents of Southern Italy, mainland Greece and the island of Crete in the 1960’s. This plant based diet is composed of lots of olive oil/olives, fresh fruits, veggies, whole grains (cereals and breads), beans, dairy in the form of yogurts and cheese, tree nuts, but no BUTTER. Also there is a moderate consumption of fish and poultry, low to moderate consumption of eggs and a low consumption of red meat. Moderate alcohol intake, optional to the diet, is an additional beverage added to meals. Regular outdoor ...

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