Nov 20 2011

New Nerdel PSA : Nerdel Loves Fruits & Veggies: From My Garden to MyPlate

As many of you know already, the USDA has changed its eating and nutritional educational system from a pyramid to a plate (www.ChooseMyPlate.gov). All of the nutritional information is based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which is a structured knowledge base to help people make better nutritional choices. The main messages from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines and ChooseMyPlate.gov are the following: It’s okay to enjoy your meals but eat less Avoid overeating and sized portions Make half your plate fruits and veggies Switch to fat-free or low fat (1%) dairy products Follow a lower sodium diet Drink water in place of sugary beverages Cut back on solid fats (e.g. trans fats, saturated fats), refined grains and added sugars Eat more whole grains Add more veggies to each and every meal  The Nerdel Company, a multi media company that wants to empower kids all over the world with the knowledge and information to make healthier nutritional choices and improve their physical fitness, has produced a new PSA (Public Service Announcement) that encourages kids to eat more fruits and veggies and to grow them in their own garden. The short video, titled Nerdel Loves Fruits & Veggies: From My Garden To MyPlate,  features the amazing puppets of The Nerdel Company: Nerdel, Chef Mangel (pronounced Mahn-jel) and the Zeppets. You can see this entertaining and educational video at www.nerdel.com, at the top right corner. The Nerdel Company has also been ...

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Jun 04 2011

MyPlate replaces MyPyramid: Graehm Gray

 Hello my fans, breaking news: MyPlate has replaced MyPyramid as the new food educational icon for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The round plate shape is in and the pyramid structure is out. The new MyPlate message is the following: A. Fruits and veggies should now make up half of your daily calorie intake. B. Grains make up over one quarter and should be mostly whole grains. C. Proteins make up less than a quarter of the calories for the day and include a recommendation for everyone (except vegetarians) to eat at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week. Less for younger children based on age. D. Dairy should be either 2 or three cups depending on age and ONLY low fat or fat free. E. Reduce your sodium intake. F. Increase water intake and reduce and avoid sugary drinks. The USDA spent approximately 2 million dollars to develop the new icon which includes promotional monies for the first year of its use. Yes, its simple and appears easier to understand than the pyramid. There is no mention of servings or portions? But I guess that depends on the size of your plate! The largest percentage of the plate goes to the plant foods which without a doubt are the healthiest foods you can consume. Unfortunately, most of us are not eating enough fruits and veggies. What are you waiting for? Low fat and ...

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Mar 04 2010

Graehm Gray: Restaurant Nutritional Labeling Laws

I was eating at a favorite restaurant with my family and another family and I started a discussion about the proposed regulations requiring restaurants to show all of the nutritional information on their menus. I asked the kids (girls ages 11-13) first what that would mean for them. Initially I thought that I would hear that they really wouldn’t look at that information. I was surprised at the answers. I listened as they told me very matter of fact, that they would read it and in fact would change their choices if they saw too much fat, sugar or salt. However I am not so sure when it comes to desserts if the nutrition facts would play any part in their decision making. Then I moved on to the adults. So I asked-would it matter to you? The answer I heard was-I would definitely read the information and tell my kids to choose something healthy. So I said-what about your choice. The responses were polarized-the moms said they would definitely choose a healthy item. The dad said-he would try to pick a healthier item but if not he would try to exercise more the next day if he didn’t. An interesting social experiment. You see my friends, it is inevitable that we will be getting barraged with more nutritional information-at the stores, on television, on the web and at now at ...

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Feb 23 2010

Graehm Gray: Childhood Obesity Definitions – Part Two

Okay, let’s review: what do we know so far? A. We know that obesity is an extra accumulation of fat. B. We know that the problem is coming from an imbalance-more energy in the form of calories (food) coming into the body-our children are eating more and not enough energy (calories) being burned off-not enough exercise. C. We  know that a pediatrician and researcher uses the Body Mass Index (BMI) as a way to identify weight problems in children-a way to measure your child’s weight against other children of the same age and sex and tell us whether he or she is at risk; D. We know that there are lots of consequences from being obese-heart disease, arthritis, sleep apnea and psychological problems and finally, E.  We know that President Obama said that 30 percent of our children are either overweight or obese .So what’s next?  Are we all sure we know whether our children are obese or just overweight? And what do we do to solve this problem? Class, let’s continue our journey-now Part two: Overweight vs. Obese: (CDC) These are terms used to classify kids and adults and based on Body Mass Index (BMI-height and weight). BMI for kids and teens takes into account growth changes, differences in body fat between boys and girls. BMI calculator for Child and Teen. So go to your pediatrician’s (or primary ...

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