May 30 2017

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World!

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World! 422 million adults live with diabetes, mainly in developing countries.   WHO calls for global action to halt rise in and improve care for people with diabetes.   Geneva: The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced. The WHO is issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first Global report on diabetes, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions. “If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.” Diabetes is a chronic, progressive NCD characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough of ...

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Jul 23 2016

WHO: Global Report on Diabetes

On the occasion of World Health Day 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) issues a call for action on diabetes, drawing attention to the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. The first WHO Global report on diabetes demonstrates that the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults. This dramatic rise is largely due to the rise in type 2 diabetes and factors driving it include overweight and obesity. In 2012 alone diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths. Its complications can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. The new report calls upon governments to ensure that people are able to make healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes. It encourages us all as individuals to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain. The Report: Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or glucose), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Diabetes is an important public health problem, one of four priority noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted for action by world leaders. Both the number of cases and the prevalence of diabetes has been steadily increasing over the past few decades GLOBAL BURDEN Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living ...

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Nov 13 2013

Are You Sleeping Enough?

As reported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the amount of sleep you need each day will change over the course of your life. Although sleep needs vary from person to person, the chart below shows general recommendations for different age groups. Age: Recommended Amount of Sleep Newborns 16–18 hours a day Preschool-aged children 11–12 hours a day School-aged children At least 10 hours a day Teens 9–10 hours a day Adults (including the elderly) 7–8 hours a day As part of a health survey for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 7–19 percent of adults in the United States reported not getting enough rest or sleep every day. Nearly 40 percent of adults report falling asleep during the day without meaning to at least once a month. Also, an estimated 50 to 70 million Americans have chronic (ongoing) sleep disorders. If you routinely lose sleep or choose to sleep less than needed, the sleep loss adds up. The total sleep lost is called your sleep debt. For example, if you lose 2 hours of sleep each night, you'll have a sleep debt of 14 hours after a week. Some people nap as a way to deal with sleepiness. Naps may provide a short-term boost in alertness and performance. However, napping doesn't provide all of the other benefits of night-time sleep. Thus, you can't really make up for lost sleep. Some people sleep more on their days off than ...

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Aug 28 2010

Graehm Gray: A Survival Guide for the Late Night TV Food Commercials

I think that I have had enough! Yes, my friends, I am throwing in the towel. I was staying up late, watching some of my favorite reruns of NCIS, Law and Order and James Bond when the munchies hit. You all know what I am talking about. Those feelings that strike, out of no where-“I’ve got to have something! Anything. I’m hungry. At least I think I am. Maybe I am. Not really but I want something to eat.” Where do these sensations come from? Who is that talking in my head? I had a good dinner just three hours earlier. Sure, could be the carbohydrates being digested and the insulin levels rising. Scientifically that makes sense. As your food digests and is broken down into tiny matter, the individual elements like fats, proteins and sugars are released and start to travel. The sugar level rising triggers a release of insulin from your pancreas. Subsequently, the insulin manages to get the sugar back into the cells and lowers the levels. But the insulin levels remain high. This may trigger additional reactions which include hunger. So there, I rationalized my late night eating. Wait a minute. Let’s get back to the reason for this article-those attractive and seductive food commercials, those DQ Blizzards, those new dark chocolate peanut butter cups, those new crust Domino’s Pizzas, those five dollar Subway sandwiches, it’s ...

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Apr 21 2010

Graehm Gray: Eating Healthy Foods Makes Us Hungrier!

I spend a lot of time trying to tell my daughter and her friends the benefits of eating healthy. I do this when we eat at home as well as when we go out to a restaurant. Sometimes, I think that I must sound like a broken record. “What about a salad,” I spout out, when I hear the chicken parmigiana or pizza being ordered. “Try the salmon, have some walnuts, what about blueberries, forget the soda, do you really want ice cream?” “Do you know how many calories is in that whatever you call it?” Yes, I am an ogre. I admit it. But I do it because I believe in eating healthy and also so my daughter will learn and eat healthy as well. Well that comes to my article of the week-which comes to us from Ayelet Fishback, and Stacey R. Finkelstein of the University of Chicago- “When Healthy Food Makes You Hungry,” and published on line in the Journal of Consumer Research. These authors examined healthy foods in the context of personal choice and freedom, commitment to a goal or target and “forced or external control” and the effect on appetite afterwards. To do this they looked at three groups of people: those given an item to eat labeled as “healthy foods”; the second group given the same exact item labeled as “tasty foods” and the ...

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