Apr 21 2017

World Immunization Week 2017

Vaccines Work A report by the World Health Organization (WHO): World Immunization Week – celebrated in the last week of April – aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives and is widely recognized as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Today, there are still 19.4 million unvaccinated and under-vaccinated children in the world. Five years into the Decade of Vaccines 2017 marks the halfway point in the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) – endorsed by 194 Member States of the World Health Assembly in May 2012 – which aims to prevent millions of deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases by 2020 through universal access to immunization. Despite improvements in individual countries and a strong global rate of new vaccine introduction, all of the targets for disease elimination—including measles, rubella, and maternal and neonatal tetanus—are behind schedule. In order for everyone, everywhere to survive and thrive, countries must make more concerted efforts to reach GVAP goals by 2020. Additionally, those countries that have achieved or made forward progress towards achieving the goals must work to sustain those efforts over time.   Why immunization matters now more than ever Expanding access to immunization is crucial to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Routine immunization is a building block of strong primary health care and universal health coverage—it provides a point of contact for health ...

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Oct 01 2016

Who Needs The Flu Shot? You Do!!!!!

An important message from the NIH and CDC: Influenza, or flu, can knock you off your feet and leave you miserable for nearly a week. It can cause fever, aches and pains, coughing, and exhaustion. The best way to avoid this fate is to get a flu vaccine each year as early as possible, before or even during flu season, which usually lasts from October to as late as May. The vaccine is available as either a shot or a nasal spray. Flu is highly contagious. When infected people cough or sneeze, the flu virus can spread to others up to 6 feet away. As many as 1 in 5 Americans come down with the flu each year, and kids are 2 to 3 times more likely than adults to get sick with the flu. Most cases are mild, but flu can also be serious, leading to hospitalization and even death. Flu vaccines can reduce illness, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school. Vaccines can also prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths. When more people get vaccinated, it’s harder for the flu virus to spread. Experts recommend that everyone 6 months and older get the annual flu vaccine, with rare exceptions. Talk to your doctor if you have questions about which vaccine options are best for you and your family. Learn more at www.flu.gov What is Influenza (also called Flu)? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness ...

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Jul 04 2016

Where Do You Stand On Immunization?

A Press release from the World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization coverage: Where do we stand?   Key facts Immunization prevents illness, disability and death from vaccine-preventable diseases including cervical cancer, diphtheria, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, pertussis (whooping cough), pneumonia, polio, rotavirus diarrhoea, rubella and tetanus. Global vaccination coverage is generally holding steady. Uptake of new and underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. But an estimated 18.7 million infants worldwide are still missing out on basic vaccines. Overview Immunization averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles. Global vaccination coverage—the proportion of the world’s children who receive recommended vaccines—has remained steady for the past few years. During 2014, about 86% (115 million) of infants worldwide received 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine, protecting them against infectious diseases that can cause serious illness and disability or be fatal. By 2014, 129 countries had reached at least 90% coverage of DTP3 vaccine.   Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes meningitis and pneumonia. Hib vaccine had been introduced in 192 countries by the end of 2014. Global coverage with 3 doses of Hib vaccine is estimated at 56%. There is great variation between regions. In the Americas, coverage is estimated at 90%, while it is only 21% and 30% in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia Regions respectively. Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ...

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Jan 01 2015

The Latest News About The Flu

The most recent FluView report for the 2014-2015 flu season shows that flu season in the United States has begun and about half the country is experiencing high levels of flu activity. Reports of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths are elevated. Activity is expected to continue for several weeks, especially in parts of the country that have not yet seen significant activity. CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months and older. There are documented benefits from flu vaccination, including reductions in illnesses, related doctors' visits and missed work or school. Vaccination also prevents flu-related hospitalizations and deaths. While most of the viruses spreading this season are different from what is in the vaccine, vaccination can still provide protection and might reduce severe outcomes such as hospitalization and death. If you have not been vaccinated yet this season, get your flu vaccine now. CDC recommends a three-pronged approach to fighting flu: get vaccinated, take everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs and takeantiviral medications to treat flu illness if your doctor prescribes them. For more information, please visit the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov.

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Dec 07 2014

WARNING: CDC Reports Severe Flu Season Coming!

Early data suggests that the current 2014-2015 flu season could be severe. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges immediate vaccination for anyone still unvaccinated this season and recommends prompt treatment with antiviral drugs for people at high risk of complications who develop flu. So far this year, seasonal influenza A H3N2 viruses have been most common. There often are more severe flu illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths during seasons when these viruses predominate. For example, H3N2 viruses were predominant during the 2012-2013, 2007-2008, and 2003-2004 seasons, the three seasons with the highest mortality levels in the past decade. All were characterized as “moderately severe.” Increasing the risk of a severe flu season is the finding that roughly half of the H3N2 viruses analyzed are drift variants: viruses with antigenic or genetic changes that make them different from that season’s vaccine virus. This means the vaccine’s ability to protect against those viruses may be reduced, although vaccinated people may have a milder illness if they do become infected. During the 2007-2008 flu season, the predominant H3N2 virus was a drift variant yet the vaccine had an overall efficacy of 37 percent and 42 percent against H3N2 viruses. “It’s too early to say for sure that this will be a severe flu season, but Americans should be prepared,” said CDC director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We can save lives with a three-pronged effort ...

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May 26 2014

The CDC Guide To The 2014 FIFA World Cup In Brazil

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association’s (FIFA) World Cup is a football (soccer) tournament held every 4 years with teams competing from all over the world. The 2014 World Cup is scheduled from June 12 through July 13, 2014 and will be located in twelve cities across Brazil. If you plan to travel to Brazil for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, follow the recommendations below to help you stay safe and healthy. What can travelers do to protect themselves? Before your trip: • Schedule a health appointment at least 4–6 weeks before you depart on your trip. Talk to your doctor or nurse about vaccines and medicines recommended for Brazil. See the Find a Clinic webpage for help in finding a travel medicine clinic near you. o CDC recommends all travelers be up-to-date onroutine vaccines, including measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, varicella (chickenpox), polio, and flu. o Other recommended vaccines may includehepatitis A, typhoid, hepatitis B, yellow fever, and rabies. o Medicine for malaria and travelers’ diarrhea may be recommended. • Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance. • Pack a travel health kit. • Monitor travel warnings and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State. • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home. During your trip: • Follow security and safety guidelines. US travelers may be targets for criminals during mass gatherings. o If possible, don't travel at night, avoid questionable areas, and ...

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Apr 19 2014

Is Your Child Up To Date on Their Immunizations?

Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children in Easy-to-read Formats: The recommended immunization schedule is designed to protect infants and children early in life, when they are most vulnerable and before they are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. Immunizations have had an enormous impact on improving the health of children in the United States. Most parents today have never seen first-hand the devastating consequences that vaccine-preventable diseases have on a family or community. While these diseases are not common in the U.S., they persist around the world. It is important that we continue to protect our children with vaccines because outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases can and do occasionally occur in this country. Vaccination is one of the best ways parents can protect infants, children, and teens from 16 potentially harmful diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases can be very serious, may require hospitalization, or even be deadly – especially in infants and young children. Check the schedule for the age or age range when each vaccine or series of shots is recommended. Or create a personalized schedule that shows the recommended dates for your child. If your child has missed any shots, use the catch-up scheduler tool to see recommended vaccination dates for the missed or skipped vaccines. See your child’s doctor with any questions. For more information, call toll free Para más información, llame a la línea de atención gratuita 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) or visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines

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Nov 15 2013

Did You Get Your Flu Shot? It’s Not Too Late!

Did you get your flu shot yet? It's not too late! As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, many people think that the flu season ends in November and its already too late to get vaccinated. Well my friends, the answer is that it's not too late. According to Dr. Anne Schuchat, Assistant Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service and Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, "Flu season typically peaks in late February and can last as late as May." Dr. Schuchat also emphasized, " We are encouraging people who have not yet been vaccinated this season to get vaccinated now." Some of the typical flu symptoms for millions of people every season, include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle aches and pains, fatigue and very miserable days spent in bed, usually home from work or school. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized in the United States every year from flu complications including 20,000 children! Over a period of 30 years, between 1976 and 2006, estimates of the yearly flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3000 to a high of about 50,000 people. The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine to everyone 6 months and older. Flu shots are generally safe (most common side effects of the shot are ...

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Sep 08 2012

Influenza : Facts And Information You Need To Know!! Part Two

What is the best way to protect myself and my family from the flu? Everyone 6 months of age or older should get the flu vaccine as soon as it is available in your area. What everyday steps can I take to stop the spread of germs? There are steps you can take in your daily life to help protect you from getting the flu. Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread this way. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. Practice good health habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. If you are sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medicine. Are there medications I can take to prevent getting the flu? If you are healthy but exposed to a person with the flu, antiviral drugs can prevent you from getting sick. The sooner you are treated with an antiviral, the more likely it will prevent the flu. Antiviral drugs are 70% to 90% effective at preventing the flu. Talk to your health care provider if you think you need antiviral drugs. Vaccination Everyone 6 months of age ...

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Sep 08 2012

Influenza: Facts And Information You Need To Know!! Part One

This year’s forecast is for lots of colds, viruses, infections and influenza. So what do you need to know? Well my friends, here it is-everything you need to know about the flu season, brought to you by flu.gov –in a two part article. Print this out and put this on your refrigerator or bulletin board or where ever you can keep checking it. Every family member (and  teachers-every child in your class) needs to read this. Remember this information is meant for educational purposes; always consult with your medical provider regarding any and all medical questions. Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. Approximately 5-20% of U.S. residents get the flu each year. Flu season      typically peaks in January or February. Getting the flu vaccine your best protection against the flu. Flu-related      complications include pneumonia and dehydration. Illness from      seasonal flu usually lasts one to two weeks. What is the seasonal flu? Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It spreads between people and can cause mild to severe illness. In some cases, the flu can lead to death. When is flu season? In the United States, flu season occurs in the fall and winter. Seasonal flu activity usually peaks in January or February, but it can occur as early as October and as late as May. How does seasonal flu spread? Most experts believe that you get the flu ...

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