Nov 15 2013

Did You Get Your Flu Shot? It’s Not Too Late!

Did you get your flu shot yet? It's not too late! As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, many people think that the flu season ends in November and its already too late to get vaccinated. Well my friends, the answer is that it's not too late. According to Dr. Anne Schuchat, Assistant Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service and Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, "Flu season typically peaks in late February and can last as late as May." Dr. Schuchat also emphasized, " We are encouraging people who have not yet been vaccinated this season to get vaccinated now." Some of the typical flu symptoms for millions of people every season, include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle aches and pains, fatigue and very miserable days spent in bed, usually home from work or school. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized in the United States every year from flu complications including 20,000 children! Over a period of 30 years, between 1976 and 2006, estimates of the yearly flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3000 to a high of about 50,000 people. The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine to everyone 6 months and older. Flu shots are generally safe (most common side effects of the shot are ...

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Sep 08 2012

Influenza : Facts And Information You Need To Know!! Part Two

What is the best way to protect myself and my family from the flu? Everyone 6 months of age or older should get the flu vaccine as soon as it is available in your area. What everyday steps can I take to stop the spread of germs? There are steps you can take in your daily life to help protect you from getting the flu. Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread this way. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. Practice good health habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. If you are sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medicine. Are there medications I can take to prevent getting the flu? If you are healthy but exposed to a person with the flu, antiviral drugs can prevent you from getting sick. The sooner you are treated with an antiviral, the more likely it will prevent the flu. Antiviral drugs are 70% to 90% effective at preventing the flu. Talk to your health care provider if you think you need antiviral drugs. Vaccination Everyone 6 months of age ...

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Sep 08 2012

Influenza: Facts And Information You Need To Know!! Part One

This year’s forecast is for lots of colds, viruses, infections and influenza. So what do you need to know? Well my friends, here it is-everything you need to know about the flu season, brought to you by flu.gov –in a two part article. Print this out and put this on your refrigerator or bulletin board or where ever you can keep checking it. Every family member (and  teachers-every child in your class) needs to read this. Remember this information is meant for educational purposes; always consult with your medical provider regarding any and all medical questions. Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. Approximately 5-20% of U.S. residents get the flu each year. Flu season      typically peaks in January or February. Getting the flu vaccine your best protection against the flu. Flu-related      complications include pneumonia and dehydration. Illness from      seasonal flu usually lasts one to two weeks. What is the seasonal flu? Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It spreads between people and can cause mild to severe illness. In some cases, the flu can lead to death. When is flu season? In the United States, flu season occurs in the fall and winter. Seasonal flu activity usually peaks in January or February, but it can occur as early as October and as late as May. How does seasonal flu spread? Most experts believe that you get the flu ...

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Jan 05 2012

Top Ten Ways to Stay Healthy and Fit For 2012

Here are my top ten ways to stay fit and healthy for 2012: 10. Eat more fruits and veggies for every meal-yes, this is super important. Besides being a recommendation by the USDA and the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, fruits and veggies have lots of vitamins, antioxidants, nutrients and fiber with very little fat and sugar. Remember to “make half of your plate fruits and veggies.” 9. Exercise for at least 60 minutes a day. Okay, I know you are saying to yourself, “unrealistic,” but this is really important, not only for kids but for adults too. Exercise provides many healthy benefits including weight control and it has been firmly established that those adults that exercise on a regular basis are a healthier group of adults and can maintain their good health as they age. For kids, they too need 60 minutes a day-including recess and other physical activity. For some adults, 90 minutes is needed. Walking is included and remember the 10,000 steps a day theory-that will equal approximately 5 miles-so get yourself a pedometer and get going! 8. Drink lots of water and forget the sugar and salt loaded, supplement loaded energy drinks. Many of the energy drinks that are available today are meant for use by athletes that are involved with vigorous training. If you fit into that category, then maybe you can benefit from a supplement loaded fluid replacement. ...

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Dec 05 2011

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH NEWS: WOMEN WHO EAT LOTS OF VEGETABLES HAVE A LOWER RISK OF STROKE, VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AND EFFECT ON BRAIN FUNCTIONING, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE GOES UNTREATED IN MANY TEENS, WHY YOU NEED TO TAKE THE FLU VACCINE?

WOMEN WHO EAT LOTS OF VEGETABLES HAVE A LOWER RISK OF STROKE Dr. Susanne Rautiainen and her research group from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, reported in the journal: Stroke, that after collecting data on the dietary habits of women, they found that those women who consumed the highest amount of antioxidant containing foods (foods that have elevated levels of vitamins C, E, carotenoids, flavonoids and phytochemicals-fruits and veggies and grains) had a lower risk of stroke.  Lesson-Make half your plate fruits and veggies-especially if you are a woman!!! VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AND EFFECT ON BRAIN FUNCTIONING Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine presented data recently showing that in a test group of young men, ages 18 to 29, that were told to play a violent video game for ten hours, MRI studies and cognitive testing performed afterwards revealed changes in brain function, and cognitive behavior. These changes did revert back almost to baseline, after a week of not playing the games. Lesson: parents, be careful with what video games your children are playing in your home and at the homes of friends. There is an abundance of violent and incredibly popular video games coming out daily, for all of the techno-game boxes and these games seem to obtain viewing access in many homes with young children. Be aware,  stay informed and stay connected ! HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE GOES UNTREATED IN MANY ...

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Sep 08 2009

Graehm Gray-Is it Time to Find an Alternative to Handshaking?

Graehm Gray, Editor-In-Chief I guess by now you have all heard about the Swine Flu. If you haven’t, where have you been hiding? Just turn on the television, or read your favorite newspaper or online news service. The reports of the novel H1N1, as they now refer to it, are everywhere. You can read about it in The Nerdel News and find out if you are in a category of people that needs to take the H1N1 vaccine. Okay, so you know about it. What are you doing about it? Are you washing your hands enough? How many door knobs did you touch today? Did you wash your hands after touching each one-probably not. Did you use the waterless antibacterial gel after touching each door knob? Again, probably not.  And what about those shoes you are wearing. Where have they been today? I doubt that you have followed the Japanese ritual of removing your shoes before you entered your home.  Are you tracking in millions of unseen microbes and bugs into your living room as we speak? Probably  yes! We are being bombarded by zillions of tiny invaders on a daily basis-bacteria, fungi and viruses. Most of the time, our immune systems are able to fight them. Sometimes they can’t. Some people have medical problems that weaken the immune system. Children, pregnant women, and the elderly also may have weakened immune systems. ...

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Sep 03 2009

Graehm Gray-Be prepared for the Flu of 2009!Here’s What You Need To Know!

I just received an email from my daughter's school. I am trying to get used to this age of technology. But it scares me to get a letter from her school. Especially an email which came on my Blackberry. Anyway, it's still summer, and she is home, so I know nothing is wrong, but I was still anxious. As it turns out, it was an information letter regarding the “Swine Flu”. As you all know, the Swine Flu (originally called this because of similar genes found in the virus that are also found in pigs), or as it is called now in the press “Novel H1N1” or just simply “H1N1”is a virus. It is from swine origin, spreading person to person and was first confirmed in the United States back in March and April of this year. Since that time, all fifty U.S. states, including Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have confirmed cases of H1N1. The majority of cases are in the age group 5-24 years old, but people of all ages are at risk. So I went to the CDC site (cdc.gov) and here is what I found out: What are the major symptoms according to the CDC are:

Symptom (%)
Fever 93%
Cough 83%
Shortness of breath 54%
Fatigue/Weakness 40%
Chills 37%
Myalgias 36%
Rhinorrhea 36%
Sore Throat 31%
Headache 31%
Vomiting 29%
Wheezing 24%
Diarrhea 24%
How is H1N1 spreading? According to the CDC: The virus is spreading person to person by coughing, sneezing, touching ...

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Sep 03 2009

Graehm Gray-Should You Get the Novel Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine?

The vaccine against the infection with novel influenza A H1N1 will be available in October 2009. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the current seasonal influenza vaccines are not likely to provide protection against novel influenza H1N1. Here are the five main targeted groups that the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization (ACIP) recommends get the vaccine: Pregnant Women-they are at higher risk of complications and can potentially provide protection to infants who cannot be vaccinated Persons who live with or provide care for infants aged <6 months (e.g. parents, siblings, and daycare providers)- younger infants are at higher risk of influenza-related complications and cannot be vaccinated. Vaccination of those in close contact with infants less than 6 months old might help protect infants by “cocooning” them from the virus; Health-care and emergency medical services personnel-infections among healthcare workers have been reported and this can be a potential source of infection for vulnerable patients. Also, increased absenteeism in this population could reduce healthcare system capacity; Persons aged 6 months-24 years- Children from 6 months through 18 years of age because there have been many cases of novel H1N1 influenza in children and they are in close contact with each other in school and day care settings, which increases the likelihood of disease spread, and Young adults 19 through 24 years of age because there have been many cases of novel H1N1 influenza in ...

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