Oct 18 2016

Let’s All Celebrate World Osteoporosis Day!

Nerdel wants all parents and grandparents to be aware of how important your bones are!   What is World Osteoporosis Day? World Osteoporosis Day takes place every year on October 20, launching a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Organized by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) every year, World Osteoporosis Day involves campaigns by national osteoporosis patient societies from around the world with activities in over 90 countries.   History of World Osteoporosis Day The concept for World Osteoporosis Day started with a campaign launched by the United Kingdom's National Osteoporosis Society and supported by European Commission on October 20, 1996. Since 1997, the day has been organized by IOF. In 1998 and 1999, the World Health Organization acted as co-sponsor of World Osteoporosis Day. Since 1999, World Osteoporosis Day campaigns have featured a specific theme.  

Osteoporosis
What is osteoporosis? Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men aged 50 years and over will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and fragile, so that they break easily – even as a result of a minor fall, a bump, a sneeze, or a sudden movement. Fractures caused by osteoporosis can be life-threatening and a major cause of pain and long-term disability.  Prevention Can osteoporosis and fractures be prevented? Yes, if action is
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Feb 06 2016

Make Healthy Nutritional Choices For Your Superbowl Party!

A report from the NIH: We make dozens of decisions every day. When it comes to deciding what to eat and feed our families, it can be a lot easier than you might think to make smart, healthy choices. It takes just a little planning. The food we put into our bodies is our fuel. It provides us with nutrients—the vitamins, minerals, and other compounds our bodies need to function and thrive. Research shows that good food choices are especially important for children’s growing bodies and minds. Smart choices have both immediate and long-lasting benefits for you and your family.   “My best advice is for parents to be good role models by eating healthy and being physically active with their children,” says Janet de Jesus, a nutritionist at NIH. “Keep healthy foods around the house for meals and snacks. If you save desserts and treats for special occasions, it will be more special. Involve children in the meal planning and cooking, and they will be more likely to eat the meals.”   “Parents can begin teaching their children about healthy eating from the day they are born,” says Dr. Donna Spruijt–Metz, whose research at the University of Southern California focuses on preventing and treating obesity in minority youth. “Setting a good example is very important.”   Try the GO, SLOW, WHOA approach to food. GO foods are great to eat anytime. They have lots of nutrients and ...

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Dec 08 2013

The CDC Guide To Food Safety: Part One

What is foodborne illness (disease, infection)? Foodborne illness (sometimes called "foodborne disease," "foodborne infection," or "food poisoning) is a common, costly—yet preventable—public health problem. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Many different disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, can contaminate foods, so there are many different foodborne infections. In addition, poisonous chemicals, or other harmful substances can cause foodborne diseases if they are present in food. • More than 250 different foodborne diseases have been described. Most of these diseases are infections, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can be foodborne. • Other diseases are poisonings, caused by harmful toxins or chemicals that have contaminated the food, for example, poisonous mushrooms. • These different diseases have many different symptoms, so there is no one "syndrome" that is foodborne illness. However, the microbe or toxin enters the body through the gastrointestinal tract, and often causes the first symptoms there, so nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea are common symptoms in many foodborne diseases. Many microbes can spread in more than one way, so we cannot always know that a disease is foodborne. The distinction matters, because public health authorities need to know how a particular disease is spreading to take the appropriate steps to stop it. • For example, Escherichia coli 157:H7 infections can spread through contaminated food, contaminated drinking water, contaminated swimming water, and from toddler to toddler at a ...

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Mar 10 2011

How To Get Your Kids To Eat More Vegetables: Graehm Gray

It’s a daily task for all parents, school dieticians and child caretakers-how to get your kids to eat more vegetables. Authors Jessica Seinfeld (Deceptively Delicious-HarperCollins) and Missy Chase Lapine (The Sneaky Chef-Running Press) have taught us fantastic ways to hide the veggies inside delicious and tasty foods. Now researcher Dr. Teresia O’Connor*, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and her colleagues at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine, writing in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, have discovered what parental methods are effective to “promote greater fruit and vegetable consumption” and what practices don’t work well. Effective Methods for parents: Make fruits and vegetables more available by serving them daily Have them at home ready to eat and in easy reach of the children Have the parents be role models by eating more fruits and veggies. Going to the grocery store with your child and have them pick out fruits and veggies Letting your child select the produce that will be served for a meal and help prepare it Tell your child in a positive manner the benefits of eating fruits and veggies   Ineffective Methods:  Bribing children to eat fruits and veggies Punishing children for not eating fruits and veggies Making your child feel guilty for not eating fruits and veggies  Bottom line: get your kids involved in the meal plan of your home. Start from the selection of the fruit and vegetable at the store and ...

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Feb 05 2011

Best Diet in the Universe-Secret Diet Tips Revealed! Graehm Gray

Hello fans of mine, and welcome back to The Best Diet in the Universe. It’s what you all have been waiting for. It’s what you have been preparing for. It’s time to get started. It’s time to get fit and healthy. It’s time to get into shape! So all of you that have read the last two blog columns-you are ready! Let’s take a moment and review all the major points that got you this far: The junk food in your kitchen is gone-hasta la vista baby! It’s replaced by healthier items. Don’t worry-I will give you a list of the healthy items you should stock up on. You got on the scale and now you know! Had to be done! This is your starting weight. And we all need a starting point. You will weigh yourself every few days and watch the weight fall off. You made a realistic weight loss goal. This is so important. So many times we say-I am going to lose 20 pounds, or 30 pounds.” Never happens. This goal needs to be something you CAN actually reach. This doesn’t have to be the only goal. Once you reach this weight target, you reassess and look at the next goal. One of the major problems that we all face is once we achieved the first goal-we don’t sustain it and we gain back the weight. So a realistic weight ...

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May 17 2010

Graehm Gray: The White House Weighs In On Childhood Obesity

The White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity issued a report to the President on childhood obesity on May 13th, 2010 entitled: Solving The Problem Of Childhood Obesity Within A Generation. It is a summary of recommendations on how to approach the epidemic and focuses on four “priority” areas: 1. Empowering parents and caregivers; 2. Providing healthy foods in schools; 3. Improving access to healthy, affordable foods; and 4. Increasing physical activity. The goal for the Task Force is “returning to a childhood obesity rate of just 5% by 2030.” Can this be achieved? I am not so certain. Of course additional indicators such as measuring the number of children eating a healthy diet, making sure that children eat less sugar in their diet, increasing fruits and vegetables and increasing physical activity will be extremely important for the success of this plan.  The report indicates that: A. one in every three children (31.7%) ages 2-19 is overweight or obese,  B. that obesity is estimated to cause 112,000 deaths per year in the United States, C. one third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes and D. even more starling that the current generation may be on track to have a shorter lifespan than their parents. Additional points from the report are the following: Each year obese adults incur an estimated $1429 more in medical expenses than ...

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