Jun 10 2016

Happy Birthday MyPlate!!!

Happy birthday MyPlate! Adults and kids of all ages need healthy nutrition and physical activity. MyPlate was invented just for you!!! MyPlate is a reminder to find your healthy eating style and build it throughout your lifetime. Everything you eat and drink matters. The right mix can help you be healthier now and in the future. This means: Focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Choose foods and beverages with less saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars. Start with small changes to build healthier eating styles. Support healthy eating for everyone. Eating healthy is a journey shaped by many factors, including our stage of life, situations, preferences, access to food, culture, traditions, and the personal decisions we make over time. All your food and beverage choices count. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you create a healthier eating style that meets your individual needs and improves your health. Build a Healthy Eating Style All food and beverage choices matter – focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Focus on making healthy food and beverage choices from all five food groups includingfruitsvegetablesgrainsprotein foods, and dairy to get the nutrients you need. Eat the right amount of calories for you based on your age, sex, height, weight, and physical activity level. Building a healthier eating style can help you avoid overweight and obesity and reduce your risk of diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Feb 06 2014

Why We Should Be Very Afraid Of Salt

Everyone needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt helps maintain the body's balance of fluids. Salt also functions in many foods as a preservative by helping to prevent spoilage and keeping certain foods safe to eat. But nearly all Americans consume more salt than they need, according to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These guidelines are published every five years by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The natural salt in food accounts for about 10 percent of total intake, on average, according to the guidelines. The salt we add at the table or while cooking adds another 5 to 10 percent. About 75 percent of our total salt intake comes from salt added to processed foods by manufacturers and salt that cooks add to foods at restaurants and other food service establishments. Some FAQ about salt: Q. What are the health effects of too much salt? A. In many people, salt contributes to high blood pressure. High blood pressure makes the heart work harder and can lead to heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and kidney disease. Q. What is the daily recommended amount of sodium for adults? A. The amount of salt in a food is listed as “sodium” on the Nutrition Facts label that appears on food packaging. The Dietary Guidelines recommend that the general population consume no more than ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Nov 13 2013

New FDA “Gluten Free” Food Labeling Rules

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration published a new regulation defining the term "gluten-free" for voluntary food labeling. This will provide a uniform standard definition to help the up to 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, an autoimmune digestive condition that can be effectively managed only by eating a gluten free diet. “Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the key to treating celiac disease, which can be very disruptive to everyday life,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “The FDA’s new ‘gluten-free’ definition will help people with this condition make food choices with confidence and allow them to better manage their health.” This new federal definition standardizes the meaning of “gluten-free” claims across the food industry. It requires that, in order to use the term "gluten-free" on its label, a food must meet all of the requirements of the definition, including that the food must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. The rule also requires foods with the claims “no gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “without gluten” to meet the definition for “gluten-free.” The FDA recognizes that many foods currently labeled as “gluten-free” may be able to meet the new federal definition already. Food manufacturers will have a year after the rule is published to bring their labels into compliance with the new requirements. “We encourage the food industry to come into compliance with the new ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Apr 21 2010

Graehm Gray: Eating Healthy Foods Makes Us Hungrier!

I spend a lot of time trying to tell my daughter and her friends the benefits of eating healthy. I do this when we eat at home as well as when we go out to a restaurant. Sometimes, I think that I must sound like a broken record. “What about a salad,” I spout out, when I hear the chicken parmigiana or pizza being ordered. “Try the salmon, have some walnuts, what about blueberries, forget the soda, do you really want ice cream?” “Do you know how many calories is in that whatever you call it?” Yes, I am an ogre. I admit it. But I do it because I believe in eating healthy and also so my daughter will learn and eat healthy as well. Well that comes to my article of the week-which comes to us from Ayelet Fishback, and Stacey R. Finkelstein of the University of Chicago- “When Healthy Food Makes You Hungry,” and published on line in the Journal of Consumer Research. These authors examined healthy foods in the context of personal choice and freedom, commitment to a goal or target and “forced or external control” and the effect on appetite afterwards. To do this they looked at three groups of people: those given an item to eat labeled as “healthy foods”; the second group given the same exact item labeled as “tasty foods” and the ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share