May 23 2016

FDA Changes Nutrition Facts Food Label!

  May 20, 2016 FDA News Release The FDA today finalized the new Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods to reflect new scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. The new label will make it easier for consumers to make better informed food choices. Highlights of the Final Nutrition Facts Label Features a Refreshed Design The “iconic” look of the label remains, but we are making important updates to ensure consumers have access to the information they need to make informed decisions about the foods they eat. These changes include increasing the type size for “Calories,” “servings per container,” and the “Serving size” declaration, and bolding the number of calories and the “Serving size” declaration to highlight this information. Manufacturers must declare the actual amount, in addition to percent Daily Value of vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium. They can voluntarily declare the gram amount for other vitamins and minerals. The footnote is changing to better explain what percent Daily Value means. It will read: “*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.” Reflects Updated Information about Nutrition Science “Added sugars,” in grams and as percent Daily Value, will be included on the label. Scientific data shows that it is ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Mar 04 2014

FDA Proposes New Food Label Changes

The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. - Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science - Updated Serving Size Requirements and New Labeling Requirements for Certain Package Sizes - Refreshed Design Here is a glimpse of the proposed changes: The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. 1. Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science Require information about “added sugars.” Many experts recommend consuming fewer calories from added sugar because they can decrease the intake of nutrient-rich foods while increasing calorie intake. Update daily values for nutrients like sodium, dietary fiber and Vitamin D. Daily values are used to calculate the Percent Daily Value listed on the label, which help consumers understand the nutrition information in the context of a total daily diet. Require manufacturers to declare the amount of potassium and Vitamin D on the label, because they are new “nutrients of public health significance.” Calcium and iron would continue to be required, and Vitamins A and C could be included on ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Nov 26 2013

Intro to Organics 101

What is Organic? Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods. These methods integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used. How Are Organic Products Overseen? The National Organic Program regulates all organic crops, livestock, and agricultural products certified to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic standards. Organic certification agencies inspect and verify that organic farmers, ranchers, distributors, processors, and traders are complying with the USDA organic regulations. USDA conducts audits and ensures that the more than 90 organic certification agencies operating around the world are properly certifying organic products. In addition, USDA conducts investigations and conducts enforcement activities to ensure all products labeled as organic meet the USDA organic regulations. In order to sell, label, or represent their products as organic, operations must follow all of the specifications set out by the USDA organic regulations. How Do I Know if My Food Is Organic? Look at the label. If you see the USDA organic seal, the product is certified organic and has 95 percent or more organic content. For multi-ingredient products such as bread or soup, if the label claims that it is made with specified organic ingredients, you can be confident that those specific ingredients ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Nov 16 2013

Nutrition Facts Food Label-The Facts You Need To Know To Make The Right Choices!

When you're walking down the aisles of a supermarket, it's not unusual to see fellow shoppers reading the information on the back of a food package, box or can. They might want to know how many calories are in the food, or they might be watching their sodium intake. They could be trying to limit sugars and eat more dietary fiber. Or they could be parents trying to make the most nutritious choices for their children. All this information is available thanks to an important addition to food packaging that was introduced to the American public 20 years ago: the Nutrition Facts label. This familiar rectangular box provides, in a standard format, important information about the nutritional content for most packaged foods, including breads, cereals, canned and frozen foods, snacks, desserts and drinks. "It was revolutionary," says Jessica Leighton, Ph.D., senior nutrition science and policy advisor in FDA's Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine. "For the first time, people had consistent information they need right at the point of purchase for the majority of packaged food products." In the years since FDA issued the final rule for this labeling on Jan. 6, 1993, the Nutrition Facts label has influenced many companies to make their foods more healthful. Additionally, notes Claudine Kavanaugh, Ph.D.,M.P.H.,R.D., a scientist at the agency, "FDA was really a trailblazer in nutrition labeling. The Nutrition Facts label has been adapted by ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Nov 08 2013

FDA Targets TRANS Fat in Processed Foods

More than decade ago, a sea change began in the American diet, with consumers starting to avoid foods with trans fat and companies responding by reducing the amount of trans fat in their products. This evolution began when FDA first proposed in 1999 that manufacturers be required to declare the amount of trans fat on Nutrition Facts labels because of public health concerns. That requirement became effective in 2006. However, there are still many processed foods made with partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the major dietary source of trans fat in processed food. Trans fat has been linked to an increased risk of coronary heart disease, in which plaque builds up inside the arteries and may cause a heart attack. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that a further reduction of trans fat in the food supply can prevent an additional 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year and up to 20,000 heart attacks each year. Part of the FDA's responsibility to the public is to ensure that food in the American food supply is safe. Therefore, due to the risks associated with consuming PHOs, FDA has issued a Federal Register notice with its preliminary determination that PHOs are no longer "generally recognized as safe," or GRAS, for short. If this preliminary determination is finalized, then PHOs would become food additives subject to premarket approval by FDA. Foods containing unapproved food additives are ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Dec 25 2010

Read the Nutrition Label To Your Kids: Graehm Gray

Happy holidays to all my friends. I was reviewing many news stories on nutrition and fitness and decided to devote this column to one of the most teachable items that we all encounter-the nutrition label. Yes, that’s right, the label found on virtually every food item. You know, the one that tells us how many calories are in a serving, how many servings are in a container, how many grams of salt, fat, protein and carbohydrates the item contains. Come on, you all know what I am talking about. Well, this label is a wonderful way to teach children about food. Not to mention, a means to educate ourselves. And if we can teach our children what a serving size is, and how many calories are in a serving, we can enlighten and empower our youth to understand what and how much they should be eating and it will be a tool for making good food choices throughout their lives. Let’s go over some nutrition label factoids: The serving size: One package may contain more than one serving — so encourage your child to use the serving size on the label to discover the total number of calories and nutrients per package. The calories: look at the amount of calories in one serving. Calories provide a measure of how much energy you get from a serving of this food. Remember, most diets for ...

Posted in: Editor's Page,Home

  • Share
Feb 07 2010

Graehm Gray-Don’t Touch My Salt!

Here we go again. Now the nutritional experts are taking away my salt. How dare they! Don’t touch my salt. It’s getting harder and harder to eat foods the way I want to. Someone is always watching out for me. Who asked them to? I didn’t vote for low salt. Senator John McCain’s name and Senator Barack Obama’s name were both there. Governor Palin and Senator Biden also. Local judges running for office, a state law or two, a state Supreme Court Justice wanting to stay put. No salt. In fact there was no mention of sugar, fat, transfats, or high fructose corn syrup either. But that didn’t stop “them.” You know “them.” The ones who take away all the good stuff. Yea ,I know what the medical experts say about Transfat. The cause of obesity. Could cause heart disease. That means heart attacks. Could cause peripheral vascular disease-clogging of the arteries of the legs and neck. That’s not good. There has even been mention of transfats being associated with cancers. Who needs them? Well my friends, they are almost gone! Mayor Bloomberg of New York City banned them fro the City’s restaurants and public eateries. Most companies have eliminated them or have disguised them. The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has allowed minute amounts of these bad fats to still exist in our foods. Is that good? I ...

Posted in: Editor's Page

  • Share