May 30 2017

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World!

Diabetes: A Major Epidemic Facing The World! 422 million adults live with diabetes, mainly in developing countries.   WHO calls for global action to halt rise in and improve care for people with diabetes.   Geneva: The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced. The WHO is issuing a call for action on diabetes. In its first Global report on diabetes, WHO highlights the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. Measures needed include expanding health-promoting environments to reduce diabetes risk factors, like physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and strengthening national capacities to help people with diabetes receive the treatment and care they need to manage their conditions. “If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain,” says Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “Even in the poorest settings, governments must ensure that people are able to make these healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose and treat people with diabetes.” Diabetes is a chronic, progressive NCD characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). It occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough of ...

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May 01 2017

National Physical Fitness & Sports Month, May 2017

A report from the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay. This May, stay motivated with the President's Council's Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards. There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans to be active. We’ve created this #MoveInMay Playbook where you can find themes, tips and motivational messages that you can promote throughout the month. You can also get ideas to #MoveInMay and every day at 0to60fitness.org ! Importance of Physical Activity Physical activity provides long-term health benefits for everyone! By being active, you will burn calories that you store from eating throughout the day and—it can be as easy as walking the dog or as rigorous as running a marathon. Providing opportunities for children to be active early on puts them on a path to better physical and mental health. It's never too late to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. Physical Activity & Obesity Physical activity, along with proper nutrition, is beneficial to people of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. And it is important that everyone gets active: over the last 20 years, there's been a significant increase in obesity in ...

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Nov 29 2015

Remember The Obesity Epidemic? Still Here!

Overweight and obesity: the basics, just the facts..... Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980. In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese. 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese. More than one-third (34.9% or 78.6 million) of U.S. adults are obese. Most of the world's population live in countries where overweight and obesity kills more people than underweight. 42 million children under the age of 5 were overweight or obese in 2013. Obesity is preventable. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 U.S. dollars; the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight.   Overweight and obesity: definitions Overweight and obesity are defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health. Body mass index (BMI) is a simple index of weight-for-height that is commonly used to classify overweight and obesity in adults. It is defined as a person's weight in kilograms divided by the square of his height in meters (kg/m2). The WHO definition is: a BMI greater than or equal to 25 is overweight a BMI greater than or equal to 30 is obesity. BMI provides the most useful population-level measure of overweight ...

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Apr 03 2014

Isn’t It About Time to Switch To A Plant Based Diet ? What Are You Waiting For?

A report from NIH News In Health Vegetarians miss out on lots of foods. No grilled burgers or franks at picnics. No holiday turkey or fries cooked in animal fat. Strict vegetarians may even forego honey made by bees. But vegetarians also tend to miss out on major health problems that plague many Americans. They generally live longer than the rest of us, and they’re more likely to bypass heart-related and other ailments. The fact is, eating a more plant-based diet can boost your health, whether you’re a vegetarian or not. What is it about the vegetarian lifestyle that can protect your health? And are there risks to being vegetarian? NIH-funded researchers are looking for answers. They’re exploring the many ways that diet and other factors affect our health. Vegetarian meals focus on fruits and vegetables, dried beans, whole grains, seeds and nuts. By some estimates, about 2% of the U.S. adult population follows this type of diet. People have many reasons for becoming vegetarians. Some want to eat more healthy foods. Others have religious or economic reasons or are concerned about animal welfare. “Vegetarian diets are also more sustainable and environmentally sound than diets that rely heavily on meat, poultry and fish,” says NIH nutritionist Dr. Susan Krebs-Smith, who monitors trends in cancer risk factors. Most people think of vegetarian diets as simply eating plant foods and not eating meat, poultry and fish. “But ...

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Mar 04 2014

FDA Proposes New Food Label Changes

The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. - Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science - Updated Serving Size Requirements and New Labeling Requirements for Certain Package Sizes - Refreshed Design Here is a glimpse of the proposed changes: The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. If adopted, the proposed changes would include the following. 1. Greater Understanding of Nutrition Science Require information about “added sugars.” Many experts recommend consuming fewer calories from added sugar because they can decrease the intake of nutrient-rich foods while increasing calorie intake. Update daily values for nutrients like sodium, dietary fiber and Vitamin D. Daily values are used to calculate the Percent Daily Value listed on the label, which help consumers understand the nutrition information in the context of a total daily diet. Require manufacturers to declare the amount of potassium and Vitamin D on the label, because they are new “nutrients of public health significance.” Calcium and iron would continue to be required, and Vitamins A and C could be included on ...

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Nov 08 2013

FDA Targets TRANS Fat in Processed Foods

More than decade ago, a sea change began in the American diet, with consumers starting to avoid foods with trans fat and companies responding by reducing the amount of trans fat in their products. This evolution began when FDA first proposed in 1999 that manufacturers be required to declare the amount of trans fat on Nutrition Facts labels because of public health concerns. That requirement became effective in 2006. However, there are still many processed foods made with partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the major dietary source of trans fat in processed food. Trans fat has been linked to an increased risk of coronary heart disease, in which plaque builds up inside the arteries and may cause a heart attack. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that a further reduction of trans fat in the food supply can prevent an additional 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year and up to 20,000 heart attacks each year. Part of the FDA's responsibility to the public is to ensure that food in the American food supply is safe. Therefore, due to the risks associated with consuming PHOs, FDA has issued a Federal Register notice with its preliminary determination that PHOs are no longer "generally recognized as safe," or GRAS, for short. If this preliminary determination is finalized, then PHOs would become food additives subject to premarket approval by FDA. Foods containing unapproved food additives are ...

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Jan 05 2012

Top Ten Ways to Stay Healthy and Fit For 2012

Here are my top ten ways to stay fit and healthy for 2012: 10. Eat more fruits and veggies for every meal-yes, this is super important. Besides being a recommendation by the USDA and the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, fruits and veggies have lots of vitamins, antioxidants, nutrients and fiber with very little fat and sugar. Remember to “make half of your plate fruits and veggies.” 9. Exercise for at least 60 minutes a day. Okay, I know you are saying to yourself, “unrealistic,” but this is really important, not only for kids but for adults too. Exercise provides many healthy benefits including weight control and it has been firmly established that those adults that exercise on a regular basis are a healthier group of adults and can maintain their good health as they age. For kids, they too need 60 minutes a day-including recess and other physical activity. For some adults, 90 minutes is needed. Walking is included and remember the 10,000 steps a day theory-that will equal approximately 5 miles-so get yourself a pedometer and get going! 8. Drink lots of water and forget the sugar and salt loaded, supplement loaded energy drinks. Many of the energy drinks that are available today are meant for use by athletes that are involved with vigorous training. If you fit into that category, then maybe you can benefit from a supplement loaded fluid replacement. ...

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Mar 22 2011

National Nutrition Month – March 2011: Graehm Gray

Hello my fans. I am interrupting my Best Diet in the Universe series, which I hope you all are reading and following, and want to mention National Nutrition Month.  Sponsored by the,  American Dietetic Association*, March 2011-Eat Right With Color,has been designated as the month to promote eating healthy and exercise. As you all know, The Nerdel Company’s prime health directives besides its motto   “everything good for kids,” includes making healthy choices in what you eat and to get plenty of physical activity. So what exactly does all this mean for you and me? Well, it has to do with following the newly released 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans** and  the physical activity guidelines as well. Let’s break it down into easy facts you can use: Here are the highlights: Manage your weight by: 1.  trying to prevent and reduce being overweight, 2. Improve your eating behavior and increase your physical activity Control the amount of food you eat daily. That means for those of you overweight, REDUCING your calorie intake. Portion Control. Increase your exercise and physical activity time DAILY! Cut back on the amount of time your are sitting!!! Closely watch your weight in each stage of your life and balance the calories in with the calories out! Cut back on salt-reduce the amount of salt in your diet to 2300mg daily. If you are age 51 and older,  African American,  have diabetes, hypertension ...

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Nov 17 2010

Can Exercise Really Stop A Cold? Cutting Down On Salt and The Twinkie Diet-Views On The News: Graehm Gray

You all know by now the incredible benefits that you can get by exercising and eating healthy. Well now there is additional research which has come to us from the British Journal of Sports Medicine*(1), which demonstrated that individuals who exercised a minimum of five days a week had 43% fewer days with an upper respiratory tract infection. Wow-that’s right, exercise, five days a week helped reduce the number of colds this group of subjects had. And that’s not all. Those subjects that did the most exercise that developed a cold (upper respiratory infection) had a shorter course of infection symptoms and less severity than their shorter exercise time peers. Okay, are you getting up from that chair yet? As reported in the current meetings of The American Heart Association (AHA)*(2), salt (sodium chloride) may be harming the health of teens now and will affect them in the future. The recommendation: cut down on your salt consumption. What’s the problem associated with eating too much salt? Well for one thing, too much salt can raise your blood pressure (called high blood pressure or hypertension). By raising your blood pressure, you are putting more stress on the heart muscle. This then may cause heart problems like a heart attack or stroke. A big problem is that most high blood pressure is silent-you just don’t feel it. That’s right, you can have a silent killer ...

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Sep 29 2010

Cholesterol – cho•les•ter•ol

Pronunciation - (kuh-les-tuh-rawl)n. Hey this is an important chemical found in your blood and the walls of your cells (cell membranes). It’s fancy name is a sterol, because it helps make the working chemicals in our body, known as hormones. We need cholesterol for our skin, our shiny hair, our nervous system, our immune system and many other things. But we need the right kind. Check it out.  Our livers make cholesterol and we also absorb it (like a sponge) in our intestines, from the food we eat. Good cholesterol Yea! (HDL) gets made in our bodies when we eat fish and olive oil. Lots of exercise also helps to make more good cholesterol. Bad cholesterol Boo! (LDL)  gets made in our bodies when we eat too many saturated fats and any trans- fats (partially hydrogenated oils). Some of the places that you find saturated fats are butter, lard, high fat cheeses, cream, whole milk and fatty meats.  Trans- fats are found in margarines and many store-bought baked goods and snacks. If you are a good label reader you can stay away from trans-fats (partially hydrogenated oils). Cholesterols Campaign Message: Avoid the bad, increase the good, balance it out the way you should. Word

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