Dec 31 2017

Diabetes is on the Rise in Children and Teens!

Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO): A recent study found that rates of new cases of diabetes in children and teens rose during 2002 to 2012. The researchers reported increases in the rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes. People with diabetes have sugar (glucose) levels that are too high. Over time, high levels of blood glucose can cause many health problems. “Because of the early age of onset and longer diabetes duration, youth are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications at a younger age. This profoundly lessens their quality of life, shortens their life expectancy, and increases health care costs,” said Giuseppina Imperatore, M.D., Ph.D., an epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Key diabetes findings from the report: Across all racial/ethnic groups, the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes increased more annually from 2003-2012 in males (2.2 percent) than in females (1.4 percent) ages 0-19. Among youth ages 0-19, the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes increased most sharply in Hispanic youth, a 4.2 percent annual increase. In non-Hispanic blacks, the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes increased by 2.2 percent and in non-Hispanic whites by 1.2 percent per year. Among youth ages 10-19, ...

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Feb 06 2016

Make Healthy Nutritional Choices For Your Superbowl Party!

A report from the NIH: We make dozens of decisions every day. When it comes to deciding what to eat and feed our families, it can be a lot easier than you might think to make smart, healthy choices. It takes just a little planning. The food we put into our bodies is our fuel. It provides us with nutrients—the vitamins, minerals, and other compounds our bodies need to function and thrive. Research shows that good food choices are especially important for children’s growing bodies and minds. Smart choices have both immediate and long-lasting benefits for you and your family.   “My best advice is for parents to be good role models by eating healthy and being physically active with their children,” says Janet de Jesus, a nutritionist at NIH. “Keep healthy foods around the house for meals and snacks. If you save desserts and treats for special occasions, it will be more special. Involve children in the meal planning and cooking, and they will be more likely to eat the meals.”   “Parents can begin teaching their children about healthy eating from the day they are born,” says Dr. Donna Spruijt–Metz, whose research at the University of Southern California focuses on preventing and treating obesity in minority youth. “Setting a good example is very important.”   Try the GO, SLOW, WHOA approach to food. GO foods are great to eat anytime. They have lots of nutrients and ...

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Nov 25 2015

‘Tis The Season…For Good Nutrition!

Nutrition tips from the NIH We make dozens of decisions every day. When it comes to deciding what to eat and feed our families, it can be a lot easier than you might think to make smart, healthy choices. It takes just a little planning. The food we put into our bodies is our fuel. It provides us with nutrients—the vitamins, minerals, and other compounds our bodies need to function and thrive. Research shows that good food choices are especially important for children’s growing bodies and minds. Smart choices have both immediate and long-lasting benefits for you and your family. “My best advice is for parents to be good role models by eating healthy and being physically active with their children,” says Janet de Jesus, a nutritionist at NIH. “Keep healthy foods around the house for meals and snacks. If you save desserts and treats for special occasions, it will be more special. Involve children in the meal planning and cooking, and they will be more likely to eat the meals.” “Parents can begin teaching their children about healthy eating from the day they are born,” says Dr. Donna Spruijt–Metz, whose research at the University of Southern California focuses on preventing and treating obesity in minority youth. “Setting a good example is very important.” Try the GO, SLOW, WHOA approach to food. GO foods are great to eat anytime. They have lots of nutrients and ...

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Oct 21 2009

Graehm Gray-Trick or Treat for UNICEF!

As we approach the 2009 Halloween Evening, and start thinking about the massive amounts of sweets our children will be exposed to, it’s important for all of us to remember what happened on that Halloween night in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania back in 1950. Five children went door to door with their pastor to collect money for their friends in post World War II Europe.  At each door, they not only opened their bags for candy, but held out empty milk cartons to collect coins for children in need overseas. They collected a total of $17 and donated the entire amount to UNICEF. The ‘Trick or Treat for UNICEF’ program was started by that philanthropic action. In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson declared Halloween, October 31st, to be “UNICEF Day.”  Since 1950, over $130 million has been raised by the ‘Trick or Treat for UNICEF’ campaign. Children from all over the world participate in the program including Canada, Ireland, Mexico and Hong Kong.  Monies raised go for vaccines, clean water and improved nutrition for less fortunate children.  Movie and TV star Sarah Jessica Parker, herself a trick- or- treater for UNICEF as a child served as the 2006  “Trick or Treat for UNICEF”  spokesperson and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador . “My involvement with ‘Trick or Treat for UNICEF’ is particularly dear to me because I participated as a child,” Ms. Parker said. “Halloween can be ...

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