Apr 30 2017

Nerdel Celebrates World No Tobacco Day 2017

A World Health Organization (WHO) news report: Tobacco – a threat to development Every year, on 31 May, WHO and partners mark World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), highlighting the health and additional risks associated with tobacco use, and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. The theme for World No Tobacco Day 2017 is "Tobacco – a threat to development."   Smoking facts from the CDC: Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.1 Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death. The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year on cigarette advertising and promotions.4 Smoking costs the United States billions of dollars each year.1,5 State spending on tobacco prevention and control does not meet CDC-recommended levels.1,6,7 1% of all adults (36.5 million people): 16.7% of males, 13.6% of females were current cigarette smokers in 2015.8 Thousands of young people start smoking cigarettes every day.1 Many adult cigarette smokers want to quit smoking.   About the campaign It will demonstrate the threats that the tobacco industry poses to the sustainable development of all countries, including the health and economic well-being of their citizens. It will propose measures that governments and the public should take to promote health and development by confronting the global tobacco crisis. Goals of the World No Tobacco Day 2017 campaign Highlight the links between the use of tobacco products, tobacco control and sustainable development. ...

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Apr 22 2017

Nerdel Celebrates EARTH DAY 2017 by remembering the EPA’s 1996 FOOD Quality PROTECTION ACT

Press release from March 1997:   FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1997 EPA ANNOUNCES COMPREHENSIVE PLANS FOR PROTECTING FOOD SAFETY, REGULATING PESTICIDES UNDER THE 1996 FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a comprehensive, detailed plan for implementing the l996 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). The new law includes sweeping new food safety protections and requires major changes in how pesticides are regulated, with the goal of improving environmental and public health protection, especially for children. “The Food Quality Protection Act is one of the most significant pieces of legislation enacted in the past two decades,” said EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner. “We are committed to providing greater assurance that infants and children are protected from pesticide risks, expanding the public right-to-know about pesticides, and using the best available science in reaching our regulatory decisions as we carry out this important new law.” The FQPA Implementation Plan is based on five guiding principles that will govern the Agency’s actions: sound science; a protective, health-based approach to food safety; promotion of safer, effective pest control methods; an open, fair and consistent process that involves consultation with stakeholders and an informed public; and public accountability of EPA’s actions and resources to achieve the goals of the law. The major provisions of the new law include: o Establishing a single, health-based standard for all pesticide residues in food, whether raw or processed; o Providing for a more ...

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Apr 21 2017

World Immunization Week 2017

Vaccines Work A report by the World Health Organization (WHO): World Immunization Week – celebrated in the last week of April – aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives and is widely recognized as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Today, there are still 19.4 million unvaccinated and under-vaccinated children in the world. Five years into the Decade of Vaccines 2017 marks the halfway point in the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) – endorsed by 194 Member States of the World Health Assembly in May 2012 – which aims to prevent millions of deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases by 2020 through universal access to immunization. Despite improvements in individual countries and a strong global rate of new vaccine introduction, all of the targets for disease elimination—including measles, rubella, and maternal and neonatal tetanus—are behind schedule. In order for everyone, everywhere to survive and thrive, countries must make more concerted efforts to reach GVAP goals by 2020. Additionally, those countries that have achieved or made forward progress towards achieving the goals must work to sustain those efforts over time.   Why immunization matters now more than ever Expanding access to immunization is crucial to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Routine immunization is a building block of strong primary health care and universal health coverage—it provides a point of contact for health ...

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