Jul 23 2016

WHO: Global Report on Diabetes

On the occasion of World Health Day 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) issues a call for action on diabetes, drawing attention to the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. The first WHO Global report on diabetes demonstrates that the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults. This dramatic rise is largely due to the rise in type 2 diabetes and factors driving it include overweight and obesity. In 2012 alone diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths. Its complications can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. The new report calls upon governments to ensure that people are able to make healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes. It encourages us all as individuals to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain. The Report: Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or glucose), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Diabetes is an important public health problem, one of four priority noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted for action by world leaders. Both the number of cases and the prevalence of diabetes has been steadily increasing over the past few decades GLOBAL BURDEN Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living ...

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Jul 04 2016

Where Do You Stand On Immunization?

A Press release from the World Health Organization (WHO) Immunization coverage: Where do we stand?   Key facts Immunization prevents illness, disability and death from vaccine-preventable diseases including cervical cancer, diphtheria, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, pertussis (whooping cough), pneumonia, polio, rotavirus diarrhoea, rubella and tetanus. Global vaccination coverage is generally holding steady. Uptake of new and underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. But an estimated 18.7 million infants worldwide are still missing out on basic vaccines. Overview Immunization averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles. Global vaccination coverage—the proportion of the world’s children who receive recommended vaccines—has remained steady for the past few years. During 2014, about 86% (115 million) of infants worldwide received 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine, protecting them against infectious diseases that can cause serious illness and disability or be fatal. By 2014, 129 countries had reached at least 90% coverage of DTP3 vaccine.   Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes meningitis and pneumonia. Hib vaccine had been introduced in 192 countries by the end of 2014. Global coverage with 3 doses of Hib vaccine is estimated at 56%. There is great variation between regions. In the Americas, coverage is estimated at 90%, while it is only 21% and 30% in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia Regions respectively. Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ...

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