Mar 12 2017

Nerdel Celebrates National Nutrition Month 2017

ChooseMyPlate.gov helps to educate about a healthier lifestyle!!! MyPlate is a reminder to find your healthy eating style and build it throughout your lifetime. Everything you eat and drink matters. The right mix can help you be healthier now and in the future. This means: Focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Choose foods and beverages with less saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars. Start with small changes to build healthier eating styles. Support healthy eating for everyone. Eating healthy is a journey shaped by many factors, including our stage of life, situations, preferences, access to food, culture, traditions, and the personal decisions we make over time. All your food and beverage choices count. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you create a healthier eating style that meets your individual needs and improves your health. Take a look at A Brief History of USDA Food Guides to learn more about previous food guidance symbols. All food and beverage choices matter – focus on variety, amount, and nutrition. Focus on making healthy food and beverage choices from all five food groups including fruitsvegetablesgrainsprotein foods, and dairy to get the nutrients you need. Eat the right amount of calories for you based on your age, sex, height, weight, and physical activity level. Building a healthier eating style can help you avoid overweight and obesity and reduce your risk of diseases such as heart disease, ...

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Mar 03 2017

Birth Defects: A Worldwide Phenomenon!

A report from the CDC: Every year, about 3-6% of infants worldwide are born with a serious birth defect. This represents millions of babies and families with life-altering conditions like spina bifida and congenital heart defects. The goals for World Birth Defects Day are to raise awareness about birth defects and increase opportunities for prevention. Participate in World Birth Defects Day by sharing stories and information about birth defects using the hashtag #WorldBDDay. How Do Birth Defects Affect Babies Worldwide? Birth defects are common, costly, and critical. Most of us have been touched by someone living with a birth defect—a family member, friend, or neighbor. Over the last year, birth defects received increased attention as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and researchers worldwide worked toward clarifying the relationship between Zika virus disease and birth defects from Zika virus infection (congenital Zika syndrome). The Zika virus disease outbreak and its impact on birth defects have emphasized the need for and benefits of international collaboration and communication about birth defects prevention.1 CDC is working with organizations around the world to bring attention to this global public health issue.   Every year, about 3-6% of infants worldwide are born with a seirous birth defect. Learn more about birth defects. Birth defects can affect babies regardless of where they are born, their ethnicities, or their races. Birth defects are one of the leading causes of death for infants and young ...

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Feb 25 2017

World Hearing Day is March 3rd!!! Can Your Child Hear The Teacher?

A message from the World Health Organization (WHO): The theme for World Hearing Day 2017 “Action for hearing loss: make a sound investment” draws attention to the economic impact of hearing loss. Unaddressed hearing loss poses a high cost for the economy globally and has a significant impact on the lives of those affected. Interventions to address hearing loss are available and are cost-effective. Prevention, screening for early identification, rehabilitation through hearing devices, captioning and sign language education are among the strategies which can mitigate hearing loss and its consequences. World Hearing Day 2017 highlights actions which can be undertaken by decision-makers to address hearing loss. Blindness and Deafness Sensory impairments are when one of the senses; sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell and/ or spatial awareness is no longer functioning at normal capacity. Based on available data, the two most commonly encountered sensory impairments are blindness and deafness. They may occur separately, or in combination. Visual impairment and/or blindness: Visual impairment: Decrease or severe reduction in vision that cannot be corrected with standard glasses or contact lenses and reduces an individual’s ability to function at specific or all tasks. Blindness: Profound inability to distinguish light from dark, or the total inability to see. 80% of global blindness is preventable. Hearing loss and/or deafness: Hearing Loss: Decrease in hearing sensitivity of any level is termed as Hearing loss. Deafness: Profound or total loss of hearing in both the ears. ...

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Feb 03 2017

February is Heart Month!

A news release from the American Heart Association: American Heart Month/National Wear Red Day The American Heart Association wants to help everyone live longer, healthier lives so they can enjoy all of life’s precious moments. And we know that starts with taking care of your health. American Heart Month, a federally designated event, is a great way to remind Americans to focus on their hearts and encourage them to get their families, friends and communities involved. Together, we can build a culture of health where making the healthy choice is the easy choice.  Why? Because Life is Why. Did you know? The first American Heart Month, which took place in February 1964, was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson via Proclamation 3566 on December 30, 1963. The Congress, by joint resolution on that date, has requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating February as American Heart Month. At that time, more than half the deaths in the U.S. were caused by cardiovascular disease. While American Heart Month is a federally designated month in the United States, it’s important to realize that cardiovascular disease knows no borders. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, remains the leading global cause of death with more than 17.3 million deaths each year. That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030. President Lyndon B. Johnson’s proclamation that first declared ...

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Dec 30 2016

Can You Smell This?

A report from the National Institutes of Health: Your sense of smell enriches your experience of the world around you. Different scents can change your mood, transport you back to a distant memory, and may even help you bond with loved ones. Your ability to smell also plays a key role in your health. If your ability to smell declines, it can affect your diet and nutrition, physical well-being, and everyday safety. Whether coffee brewing, pine trees in a forest, or smoke from a fire, the things we smell are actually tiny molecules released by substances all around us. When we breathe in these molecules, they stimulate specialized sensory cells high inside the nose. Each of these sensory cells has only one type of odor receptor—a structure on the cell that selectively latches onto a specific type of “smelly” molecule. There are more smells in the environment than there are odor receptors. But a given molecule can stimulate a combination of these receptors, creating a unique representation in the brain of a particular smell. “It’s estimated that the number of odors that people can detect is somewhere between 10,000 and 100 billion, or even more,” says Dr. Gary Beauchamp, a taste and smell researcher at Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. We all have different combinations of odor-detecting cells in our noses, he explains, so people vary greatly in their sensitivity to smells. ...

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Dec 10 2016

CDC Reports Improvement in Childhood Obesity among Young Children

A new study shows that 34 of 56 WIC State Agencies are seeing modest decreases in obesity among young children from 2010-2014. The percentage of low-income children (ages 2-4) with obesity enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) decreased from 15.9% in 2010 to 14.5% in 2014. These findings come from a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Researchers analyzed obesity trends from 2000 to 2014 among young children aged 2-4 years from low-income families enrolled in (WIC). The study was recently published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ReportTrends in Obesity among Participants Aged 2-4 Years in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children—United States, 2000-2014 Summary What is already known about this topic? Previous analyses using Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) data found that during 2008–2011, obesity prevalence among children aged 2–4 years who participated in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and other nutrition and health programs declined slightly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and in 19 of 43 states and U.S. territories. What is added by this report? The WIC Participants and Program Characteristics (WIC PC) census data replace the PedNSS system to report obesity prevalence among low-income young children from more jurisdictions consistently. This is the first study to use WIC ...

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Nov 30 2016

World AIDS Day 2016

A WHO News Release: On 29th November, to mark World AIDS Day 2016, WHO will launch new guidelines on HIV self-testing to encourage countries to promote self-testing and empower more people to test for HIV. WHO is also launching a new progress report "Prevent HIV: test and treat all – WHO action for country impact". The report shows that more than 18 million people living with HIV have access to HIV treatment, but many more lack HIV diagnosis and consequently are missing out on treatment. The global HIV epidemic claimed fewer lives in 2015 than at any point in almost twenty years. Prevention programs reduced the number of new HIV infections per year to 2.1 million in 2015, a 35% decline in incidence since 2000. The massive expansion of antiretroviral therapy has reduced the number of people dying of HIV-related causes to approximately 1.1 million 2015 – 45% fewer than in 2005. Having achieved the global target of halting and reversing the spread of HIV, world leaders have set the 2020 “Fast-Track” targets to accelerate the HIV response and to END AIDS BY 2030. On World AIDS Day 2016, WHO will be promoting these new innovative HIV testing policies, urging countries and communities deploy high-impact prevention services, and further expand early and quality treatment for all, addressing geographical disparities and leaving no one behind. WHO issues new guidance on HIV self-testing ahead of World AIDS ...

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Nov 11 2016

Nerdel Salutes All of Our Veterans!

History of Veterans Day (from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs) World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” - officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.” Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities.  This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two minutes before the armistice ending World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…" The original concept for the ...

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Oct 18 2016

Let’s All Celebrate World Osteoporosis Day!

Nerdel wants all parents and grandparents to be aware of how important your bones are!   What is World Osteoporosis Day? World Osteoporosis Day takes place every year on October 20, launching a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Organized by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) every year, World Osteoporosis Day involves campaigns by national osteoporosis patient societies from around the world with activities in over 90 countries.   History of World Osteoporosis Day The concept for World Osteoporosis Day started with a campaign launched by the United Kingdom's National Osteoporosis Society and supported by European Commission on October 20, 1996. Since 1997, the day has been organized by IOF. In 1998 and 1999, the World Health Organization acted as co-sponsor of World Osteoporosis Day. Since 1999, World Osteoporosis Day campaigns have featured a specific theme.  

Osteoporosis
What is osteoporosis? Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men aged 50 years and over will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and fragile, so that they break easily – even as a result of a minor fall, a bump, a sneeze, or a sudden movement. Fractures caused by osteoporosis can be life-threatening and a major cause of pain and long-term disability.  Prevention Can osteoporosis and fractures be prevented? Yes, if action is
...

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Oct 11 2016

Presidential Proclamation — National School Lunch Week, 2016

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH WEEK, 2016 - - - - - - - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION Seventy years ago, President Harry Truman signed the National School Lunch Act, declaring "Nothing is more important in our national life than the welfare of our children, and proper nourishment comes first in attaining this welfare." This Act created the National School Lunch Program and provided lunch to 7 million children in its first year -- today, more than 30 million children depend on it each day. As we observe the 70th anniversary of this program, we recommit to ensuring access to proper nutrition throughout the school day for all our young people so that they may pursue their education and chase their dreams. Since the beginning of my Administration, I have worked to build on the legacy of the National School Lunch Program. In 2010, the Congress passed and I signed into law the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which increased the number of students who could get subsidized or free school meals and improved the quality of school meals. For children from low-income households, meals provided by the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program may be their only reliable source of nutrition throughout the day. We are working to increase access for more children, including by using Medicaid data to automatically connect eligible students in need ...

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